D H
Oct 9, 2018 · Last update 9 days ago.

How can the gender education gap be closed in developing countries?

There are many cultural, economic and societal hurdles that girls face when trying to pursue an education in many regions of the world. UNESCO estimates there are 130 million girls between the ages of 6 and 17 out of school worldwide. What can be done to help more girls receive an education in developing countries?
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Incentivise by improving work for women
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Ending conflict while supporting women in conflict zones
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Cultural change can require steady, mild adjustments
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Providing, supporting or funding education directly
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Providing scholarships
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Ending childhood marriage
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Train more female teachers
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0 disagrees
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Incentivise by improving work for women

Globally women are overrepresented in low paying, part time and informal work, they are more likely to be hired in less productive sectors with less avenues for advancing their careers. Any effort to level off this huge gender equity gap would definitely serve as a massive incentive to women and girls in education, sending a clear message not only to girls but to their families that they can be as productive as men and their education is equally as valid. A systematic set of international legal and regulatory guidelines to help improve women’s access to good jobs would help women, girls, economies and their societies globally.

blogs.worldbank.org/jobs/women-changing-world-work-not-just-more-jobs-better-jobs-women

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D H
Jul 30
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Ending conflict while supporting women in conflict zones

In countries such as Nigeria there is a huge disparity in numbers of girls in education when comparing urban and rural areas. This is more exaggerated in areas where conflict is a common occurrence. Conflict can potentially prevent all children from seeking education, but in Nigeria girls are especially vulnerable in areas combatting Boko Haram, a group who specifically target schoolgirls as part of an abduction ransom racket. Women for Women is a non-profit charity that seeks to empower women in regions affected by conflict, it does this by providing financing, access to healthcare, business/job skills and networking opportunities.

globalpartnership.org/blog/role-education-women-and-girls-conflict-and-post-conflict-countries theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2014/may/15/nigeria-girls-education-boko-haram

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D H
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DH edited this paragraph
In countries such as Nigeria there is a huge disparity in numbers of girls in education when comparing urban and rural areas. This is more exaggerated in areas where conflict is a common occurrence. Conflict can potentially prevent all children from seeking education, but in Nigeria girls are especially vulnerable in areas combatting Boko Haram, a group who specifically target schoolgirls as part of an abduction ransom racket. Women for Women is a non-profit charity that seeks to empower women in regions affected by conflict, it does this by providing financing, access to healthcare, business/job skills and networking opportunities.

Cultural change can require steady, mild adjustments

Due to cultural or religious traditions in certain countries apposing education for females, providing education to certain regions of the world can be difficult. This could be especially true of areas where conflict may be common, and regime change could mean any headway made would face severe retribution in the future. In situations such as this targeting boys and men to be part of discussions surrounding cultural and societal practices may be a stepping-stone to achieving lasting change to the benefit of future generations. Strengthening women’s collective voice so that they have more of a say in matters that concern their own lives, in cultures that resist it this can only be achieved by addressing the culture as a whole and tackling the unique hurdles that stand in the way of young women.

kenya.actionaid.org/sites/kenya/files/tackling_barriers_in_education_report_summary.pdf theguardian.com/opportunity-international-roundtables/2017/oct/04/global-poverty-child-marriage-education-girls

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DH edited this paragraph
https://kenya.actionaid.org/sites/kenya/files/tackling_barriers_in_education_report_summary.pdf https://www.theguardian.com/opportunity-international-roundtables/2017/oct/04/global-poverty-child-marriage-education-girls

Providing, supporting or funding education directly

Unquestionably poverty is one of the main factors that stands in the way of education in certain parts of the world, as paying for teachers and learning materials inevitably costs money. Organisations such as The Malala Fund not only invest in schools directly but also place activists and educators in local communities to advocate the importance of access to education for girls. This particular organisation works in some of the worst effected regions of countries such as Nigeria, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and with Syrian refugees in Lebanon and Jordan. Funding individuals is a good start but to foster a cultural norm of school attendance for girls many regions first need the monetary investment in a schooling system.

neatoday.org/2018/08/01/money-matters-in-education

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D H
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DH edited this paragraph
http://neatoday.org/2018/08/01/money-matters-in-education/

Providing scholarships

Simply providing scholarships to girls can literally be the easiest way to directly provide access to education in societies where money is the main hurdle standing in the way of a girl's access to education. The United Nations International Children's Fund (UNICEF) provides one such program through their United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative, in addition to public, political and legal advocacy the initiative supports scholarships, cash transfers, mentoring and teacher training to try and close the educational gender gap. Likewise similar scholarship programs are underway in Nigeria, where the World Bank’s $500 million credit in the form of the Adolescent Girls Initiative for Learning and Empowerment (AGILE), is set to target secondary education among girls in seven states where education levels are particularly low.

globalpartnership.org/blog/why-educating-girls-makes-economic-sense reliefweb.int/report/nigeria/nigeria-boost-support-keeping-adolescent-girls-school

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D H
Jul 29
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Ending childhood marriage

These two things reinforce one another; just as ending childhood marriage can increase the likelihood of girls having the opportunity to complete an education, so education can function as a tool to help girls avoid child marriage. In many countries parents are too poor to send all their children to school, and where social norms put the interests of men and boys first, families usually prioritise the education of their sons. In many regions child marriage is the only alternative for poor families, as sadly a daughter being married may be one less mouth to feed, and in cultures with a dowry tradition there may also be a short-term financial benefit to child marriage. Women and girls are more likely therefore to get trapped in a cycle of poverty, but education can help break that cycle and offer a long-term financial incentive, these two social issues should go hand in hand.

globalpartnership.org/blog/child-marriage-and-education-impacts-costs-and-benefits unitedworldschools.org/blog/ending-child-marriage-the-power-of-education

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D H
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Train more female teachers

In many countries female teachers are few and far between, and in certain regions that experience low female school attendance the presence of females teachers has an encouraging effect on parents sending their daughters to school. That's not to mention the positive effect a female teacher can have on a female students education, the female teacher not only functioning as a conduit for education but a role model for young girls and a more appropriate secondary care giver. Nigeria for example has a dearth of qualified female teachers, the country is home to 20% of the world’s out of school children so the government has put in place a $100 million USD grant to expand access. But the Nigerian government should also consider funding women teachers for the encouraging effects it has on parents and female students alike.

globalpartnership.org/blog/importance-female-teachers-girls-education

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