Daniel Halliday
Jun 17 · Last update 5 mo. ago.
What should America do about mass shootings and gun violence?
America has the highest rate of gun violence of all developed nations, and eight times that of its neighbour Canada*. What should be done either socially or politically to limit this? (*According to the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation)
Stats of Viewpoints
There is no point in any normal person owning a gun
1 agrees
1 disagrees
It would be unconstitutional to legislate against gun ownership in anyway
0 agrees
1 disagrees
America should catch up with the rest of the world and update its constitution regarding firearms
2 agrees
0 disagrees
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There is no point in any normal person owning a gun

A complete ban on guns should be enforced in the United States. America has a massive problem with violence and disproportionate statistics regarding murder and violent crime. While the US doesn't have the worse gun crime statistics in the continent, when compared accordingly America’s gun crime seems unparalleled, considering it as a developed nation with such a large economy.

Guns should be banned outright as there are safer and healthier alternatives to any circumstance where guns may be thought to be necessary. Hunting is being legislated against in European countries, such as the UK and Poland, as it looks like it is increasingly falling out of favour, and is generally seen as inhumane. Collecting firearms and the fetishisation of weapons is also an unhealthy personality trait that needs to be dealt with accordingly.

There is no need for any civilised citizen in a modern country to own a firearm. If someone has an overwhelming urge to use a gun, this should be carried out in a controlled, safe environment exclusively, such as a shooting range. There is no need to own a gun and no citizen should ever be allowed to take a gun into a public place as a matter of public safety.

A popular argument against gun control in the US is that guns are not the problem and that mental health care is what is lacking in the United States. However, as the mental health argument alludes to something that is impossible to predict, it mainly serves to disrupt and derail any constructive argument. While there may be some truth to this being an exasperating factor, it is obviously not a simple single root cause, and it doesn’t justify there being a lack of legislation in place to help all individuals in these circumstances. Additionally, this argument only goes to further amplify peoples possible fear of mental health issues, and could increase the negative treatment of those with mental health problems, the more widespread this view becomes.

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Daniel Halliday
Sep 2
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DH edited this paragraph
A popular argument against gun control in the US is that guns are not the problem and that mental health care is what is lacking in the United States. However, as the mental health argument alludes to something that is impossible to predict, it mainly serves to disrupt and derail any constructive argument. While there may be some truth to this being an exasperating factor, it is obviously not a simple single root cause, and it doesn’t justify there being a lack of legislation in place to help all individuals in these circumstances. Additionally, this argument only goes to further amplify peoples possible fear of mental health issues, and could increase the negative treatment of those with mental health problems, the more widespread this view becomes.
It would be unconstitutional to legislate against gun ownership in anyway

The United States Constitution's Second Amendment protects American citizen’s right to keep and bear arms, and thus the freedom to defend themselves. Any policy that goes against this right would be unconstitutional and deeply unpopular with large swathes of the US population.

Countries that have laws against firearm ownership still have black markets and some have worse violent social problems than the US, such as Honduras and Jamaica. Many countries have worse general murder statistics than the US also, and some countries with very strict gun control laws have problems with knife violence and acid attacks, like in the UK. Other random violent attacks also happen, even in countries with next to no gun violence, like Japan.

However in the US there is the big questions around the factors affecting gun violence. The two most striking of these are mental health problems and prescription drug use, as a large proportion of mass shooting incidents has been carried out by people with mental health problems or who where taking prescription medication that may have had something to do with the incident, or both.

The statistics of the over prescription of behaviour altering medication in the US is well documented and on the increase, but the US Food and Drug Administration have had thousands of reports of violent incidents from people taking FDA approved perception drugs. While the FDA has estimated that these reports amount to 1% of the total instances of violence caused by prescription drugs in the US. Meanwhile no federal or state reviews have investigated either the link to gun violence, to the review of said drug safety, or to the address the booming growth in use of these drugs.

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 4
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DH edited this paragraph
The statistics of the over prescription of behaviour altering medication in the US is well documented and on the increase, but the US Food and Drug Administration have had thousands of reports of violent incidents from people taking FDA approved perception drugs. While the FDA has estimated that these reports amount to 1% of the total instances of violence caused by prescription drugs in the US. Meanwhile no federal or state reviews have investigated either the link to gun violence, to the review of said drug safety, or to the address the booming growth in use of these drugs.
America should catch up with the rest of the world and update its constitution regarding firearms

In most countries in the world where firearms are legal in some way, they are also restricted, requiring some kind of licence or background check. America’s gun violence is 5 times higher than its neighbour, Canada, which requires gun owners to hold a licence, pass a test, have a background check and interviews.

Following the Port Arthur massacre in 1996 Australia passed the National Firearms Agreement. This was followed by a period of relatively few massacres compared to previous decades. Australians are still allowed to purchase guns but require a licence for hunting, sports shooting, pest control, collecting or farming. These licences are reviewed every three or five years and restricted to people free from mental-health problems.

Having a gun licence is more common for countries around the world than cases where it is not, and is arguably a sign of a modern developed country. The argument against having to have a licence for firearms is redundant as you are already required to have a licence for many other activities, and this is even the cause for the US. Driving, fishing, etc all require licences, so why not guns?

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Daniel Halliday
Jul 11
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DH edited this paragraph
Following the Port Arthur massacre in 1996 Australia passed the National Firearms Agreement. This was followed by a period of relatively few massacres compared to previous decades. Australians are still allowed to purchase guns but require a licence for hunting, sports shooting, pest control, collecting or farming. These licences are reviewed every three or five years and restricted to people free from mental-health problems.
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