Daniel Halliday
Sep 8 · Last update 21 days ago.
With the UN denouncing war crimes in Yemen, is support for this conflict likely to decrease?
With UN publicly outing the war crimes of both sides in the conflict in Yemen, is the international funding and arms sales that are perpetuating this conflict likely to decrease?
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It is not just international support that needs changing but International involvement
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Comparing this situation to similar past conflicts, support will most likely continue covertly
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Support will likely wane as US congress become more vocal in their disapproval
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It is not just international support that needs changing but International involvement

Despite Saudi Arabia’s reprehensible targeting of civilians, it is arguably the Saudi aid blockade, and the international involvement (not just support) in this, which form the worst humanitarian crisis of this war. Saudi warships entered Yemeni waters in 2015, forming a blockade of aid supplies into the region. The US, in addition to supplying arms and intelligence to Saudi Arabia, joined the blockade in 2016 dispatching their own warships to strengthen the Saudi Royal Navi. The blockade extended to cover both land and air aid supplies also in 2017, and has lead to mass starvation and disease epidemics, with full and direct involvement, backing and support from the US and the UK.

International support continues despite the recent killing of Saudi/US journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Arabian Consulate in Turkey. A close friend of Khashoggi recently revealed the journalist was about to reveal documentary evidence of the Saudi use of chemical weapons in Yemen. Similarly, recent revelations about prior knowledge of the murder by UK intelligence services further calls into question the role international supporters of this conflict are playing.

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Daniel Halliday
Oct 29
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DH edited this paragraph
International support continues despite the recent killing of Saudi/US journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Arabian Consulate in Turkey. A close friend of Khashoggi recently revealed the journalist was about to reveal documentary evidence of the Saudi use of chemical weapons in Yemen. Similarly, recent revelations about prior knowledge of the murder by UK intelligence services further calls into question the role international supporters of this conflict are playing.
Comparing this situation to similar past conflicts, support will most likely continue covertly

History has demonstrated to us, that when public approval is against the support of a conflict, support is publicly condemned by politicians, but continues covertly. This can be seen with the US' weapons supply to Latin America during the Carter administration of the late 70’s, or the support of Saddam Hussein in the Iran-Iraq War in the following decade.

The example of the Iraq-Iran war of the 1980’s is particularly relevant as Iraq’s main financial support during this conflict was from Saudi Arabia, receiving $30.9 billion throughout the 1980’s. Similarly as France was supporting Iraq with over a quarter of their total arms stockpile and the US subverting restrictions by covertly supplying “dual-use technology” to Iraq that was clearly used as weapons, comparisons to the Yemen conflict seem numerous. When you then consider the that Iran is presently accused of backing Houthi rebels in Yemen, it’s plain to see this present-day proxy war closely resembles the Middle Eastern wars of the 1980’s, just carried out in different regions.

The UN should be looking to reform the unfair dominance of the Permanent Five powerful nuclear states within its system, to challenge states that veto much needed international intervention, like the Russian veto that blocked a Security Counsel resolution in February 2018. The UN should endeavour to take a more direct approach, rather than publishing reports to raise awareness and effectively wash their hands of the situation.

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Daniel Halliday
Oct 17
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DH edited this paragraph
The example of the Iraq-Iran war of the 1980’s is particularly relevant as Iraq’s main financial support during this conflict was from Saudi Arabia, receiving $30.9 billion throughout the 1980’s. Similarly as France was supporting Iraq with over a quarter of their total arms stockpile and the US subverting restrictions by covertly supplying “dual-use technology” to Iraq that was clearly used as weapons, comparisons to the Yemen conflict seem numerous. When you then consider the that Iran is presently accused of backing Houthi rebels in Yemen, it’s plain to see this present-day proxy war closely resembles the Middle Eastern wars of the 1980’s, just carried out in different regions.
Support will likely wane as US congress become more vocal in their disapproval

The largest international military support to this conflict is that of the United States. They are by far the largest supporter in regards to the supplying of arms to all countries involved in the Saudi/UAE lead coalition forces, supporting the internationally recognised Hadi government in the fight against Houthi rebels and other forces, including Al-Qaeda. The UN’s report has called for a renewal of the discussion of this matter in congress in the US, but so far this has lead to no action being taken.

However with an increasing number of letters written by congressmen and women to US central command, denouncing US involvement in Yemen, it is likely the the UN’s report will have the intended effect in the long run. Likewise with a recent scandal involving the murder of a Saudi journalist in the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul, the support of a such a human rights infringing state will likely be increasing questioned by politicians, media and the general public. Opposition to Saudi support has been growing in the UK and France also, with major Labour politicians openly challenging parliament in the UK, and 75% of French people supporting the suspension of arms according to a YouGov poll.

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Daniel Halliday
Oct 17
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DH edited this paragraph
However with an increasing number of letters written by congressmen and women to US central command, denouncing US involvement in Yemen, it is likely the the UN’s report will have the intended effect in the long run. Likewise with a recent scandal involving the murder of a Saudi journalist in the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul, the support of a such a human rights infringing state will likely be increasing questioned by politicians, media and the general public. Opposition to Saudi support has been growing in the UK and France also, with major Labour politicians openly challenging parliament in the UK, and 75% of French people supporting the suspension of arms according to a YouGov poll.
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