Daniel Halliday
Sep 26 · Last update 5 days ago.
Should the UN propose stricter maritime laws?
The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) is a treaty that establishes basic law surrounding international conduct and exploitation of the seas. However there are still many disputed territories at sea and confrontations over development, mining and fishing rights. Should the UN attempt to impose a stricter convention or amendments, or should additional agreements be brokered?
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Climate change should be the most pressing maritime issue
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Maritime law is too complex and territory disputes too long running, bilateral solutions should be sought
0 agrees
1 disagrees
The seas are a hotbed of controversy, stricter laws are needed
1 agrees
0 disagrees
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Climate change should be the most pressing maritime issue

Aggressive territorial and fishing disputes are one thing, but climate change is arguably an easier and more important issue for multinational organisations to address. The world's shipping industries have a carbon footprint the size of Germany, and the International Maritime Organisation has been criticised for dragging their feet concerning this issue. The IMO has officially deciding to start only collecting data from ships universally by 2020, with data processing inevitably taking much longer, before a decision can be made conclusively on this issue. Meanwhile analysts have speculated that this may be one of the sectors with the lowest cost to addressing its carbon footprint, indicating it would be the best place to start in the fight against climate change.

The UNCLOS was formulated in 1982 and came into force in 1994, the world and the modern understanding of the oceans, not to mention climate science, has changed massively since then, and there needs to be greater recognition of the environment in admiralty law. Arguably some of the causes of maritime pollution go far beyond the shipping and logistics industries and some ocean based industries go far beyond the oceans also in regards to emissions. But with the important role oceans play in the carbon cycle, and the relative ease with which proposed clean up strategies could be implemented, the IMO and UNCLOS signatory states need to do more in regard to formulating environmentally friendly maritime law. climatechangenews.com/2016/07/15/offshore-carbon-why-a-climate-deal-for-shipping-is-sinking

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Daniel Halliday
Feb 11
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DH edited this paragraph
The UNCLOS was formulated in 1982 and came into force in 1994, the world and the modern understanding of the oceans, not to mention climate science, has changed massively since then, and there needs to be greater recognition of the environment in admiralty law. Arguably some of the causes of maritime pollution go far beyond the shipping and logistics industries and some ocean based industries go far beyond the oceans also in regards to emissions. But with the important role oceans play in the carbon cycle, and the relative ease with which proposed clean up strategies could be implemented, the IMO and UNCLOS signatory states need to do more in regard to formulating environmentally friendly maritime law. http://www.climatechangenews.com/2016/07/15/offshore-carbon-why-a-climate-deal-for-shipping-is-sinking/
Maritime law is too complex and territory disputes too long running, bilateral solutions should be sought

Exceptions to maritime boundary laws are too long running and complex a legal issue; the United Nations Convention of the Law of the Sea being fairly comprehensive but allowing many states, both signatories and not, to claim exceptions to the law. Furthermore when considering the 30 UN member states that have refused to ratify the treaty or parts of it (as is the case with the US), the matter of maritime boundaries alone seems too difficult to reach a consensus on. States should therefore be looking to settle disputes diplomatically and bilaterally on a case by case basis.

One of the most complex maritime boundary issues involves multiple countries territorial claim to the South China Sea, and China having the largest boundary claim has suggested and pursued such bilateral solutions. Likewise with the so called “Scallop Wars” between French and English fisherman continuing over decades despite the UK being an European Union member, the two countries should seek a similar country to country diplomatic solution, especially considering Britain’s exit from the EU. Rather than further alienating disagreeing states with tighter laws and restrictions, multilateral agreements and positive diplomacy are probably the best way towards greater maritime peace and security. conceptnewscentral.com/index.php/2017/07/01/china-seeks-anew-peaceful-solution-south-china-sea-disputes washingtonpost.com/world/2018/08/29/scallop-wars-french-british-vessels-clash-english-channel/?utm_term=.231ebb95c7f8

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Daniel Halliday
Feb 11
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DH edited this paragraph
Exceptions to maritime boundary laws are too long running and complex a legal issue; the United Nations Convention of the Law of the Sea being fairly comprehensive but allowing many states, both signatories and not, to claim exceptions to the law. Furthermore when considering the 30 UN member states that have refused to ratify the treaty or parts of it (as is the case with the US), the matter of maritime boundaries alone seems too difficult to reach a consensus on. States should therefore be looking to settle disputes diplomatically and bilaterally on a case by case basis.
The seas are a hotbed of controversy, stricter laws are needed

There are currently maritime regions, such as the South China Sea, that are involved in a stalemate of disputes involving multiple countries. Additionally fishermen in countries like France and England have recently been involved in aggressive disputes, including dangerous instances of boat ramming. Stricter laws are needed internationally so that there is no room for interpretation or exceptions within the law, the UN should be spearheading this issue to minimise such acts of aggression and disputes.

The United Nations has appointed the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), an autonomous organisation, to oversee international shipping regulations and international sea safety law. The IMO has already arranged a series of international conventions regarding maritime safety, pollution, rescue, sea boundaries and fishing restrictions. However, to date there are many countries that have not fully ratified or even signed some of these conventions, a key reason for the large number of maritime disputes. The IMO needs to get all treaties ratified before more laws can then be passed for stricter control of the seas. imo.org/en/Pages/Default.aspx

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Daniel Halliday
Feb 11
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DH edited this paragraph
There are currently maritime regions, such as the South China Sea, that are involved in a stalemate of disputes involving multiple countries. Additionally fishermen in countries like France and England have recently been involved in aggressive disputes, including dangerous instances of boat ramming. Stricter laws are needed internationally so that there is no room for interpretation or exceptions within the law, the UN should be spearheading this issue to minimise such acts of aggression and disputes.
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