Daniel Halliday
Jul 22 · Last update 1 mo. ago.
Is the US war on drugs destroying Central America?
Is the United States war on drugs have adverse effects in Mexico and Central America?
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The wide spread social problems in Central America go far beyond the US drug black market
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Any attempt to criminalise substances will end in the proliferation of criminal organisations
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It is destroying not just Central America but also millions of lives in the United States of America
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Yes, the legal status of drugs in the US is fuelling crime and corruption elsewhere
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The wide spread social problems in Central America go far beyond the US drug black market

Bribery, cronyism, oligarchy, electoral fraud, exploitation and a lack of transparency, accountability and effectiveness plague the governments and police of Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. To blame that all on the US drug black market is somewhat short sighted. Rights and equality, economic issues, education, and health issues all add to crime and corruption as massive societal problems that hold Central and Latin American countries back from development.

Mexico’s corruption problems are rooted in the countries revolution at the start of the 20th century, and the following 71 year rule of the Institutional Revolutionary Party that followed. The PRI created a political environment where they exchanged bribes for support and votes, fundamentally undermining democracy in Mexico. Seven decades of such a system saw the consolidation of power in the hands of an elite few and allowed corruption to accumulate and grow in complexity as it pervaded throughout society.

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Daniel Halliday
Nov 2
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DH edited this paragraph
Bribery, cronyism, oligarchy, electoral fraud, exploitation and a lack of transparency, accountability and effectiveness plague the governments and police of Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. To blame that all on the US drug black market is somewhat short sighted. Rights and equality, economic issues, education, and health issues all add to crime and corruption as massive societal problems that hold Central and Latin American countries back from development.
Any attempt to criminalise substances will end in the proliferation of criminal organisations

All treatment of drugs in this way causes the similar problem of black market emergence, in all circumstances. The most well know example of this is the prohibition of alcohol in the United States in early 20th century. Although prohibition was put into place to deal with excessive levels of crime and violence in society, criminal organisations took over the alcohol market and violent crime and other issues became even more frequent. Likewise, the war on drugs in many countries around the world has lead to so many uncontrollable drug problems or tragedies, and has funded crime.

Conversely it is the legalisation or decriminalisation of drugs, and treating the problem as that of a health problem, rather than a criminal one, that seems to be the most effective and have the biggest positive effect. In 2001, Portugal, a country riddled with opioid addiction, and massive nationwide drug problems, decriminalised all drugs. The drug crisis soon stabilised with dramatic falls in the level of drug use, HIV, Hepatitis, overdose, drug related crime and incarceration. This massive change is undoubtedly linked to changing drug use and possession from an arrestable offence to a finable one, and combining that with a thorough rehabilitation and support program.

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Daniel Halliday
Nov 2
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DH edited this paragraph
Conversely it is the legalisation or decriminalisation of drugs, and treating the problem as that of a health problem, rather than a criminal one, that seems to be the most effective and have the biggest positive effect. In 2001, Portugal, a country riddled with opioid addiction, and massive nationwide drug problems, decriminalised all drugs. The drug crisis soon stabilised with dramatic falls in the level of drug use, HIV, Hepatitis, overdose, drug related crime and incarceration. This massive change is undoubtedly linked to changing drug use and possession from an arrestable offence to a finable one, and combining that with a thorough rehabilitation and support program.
It is destroying not just Central America but also millions of lives in the United States of America

The war on drugs has focussed too heavily on criminalisation and too lightly on rehabilitation. This has seen a dramatic growth in prison populations, with over 2 million people incarcerated currently, roughly a quarter of those are for drug offences. This population is thought to be driven by the estimated 6.8 million Americans struggling with drug dependance issues.

US prisons underwent privatisation as far back as the 19th century, but rapid privatisation in the 1980’s resulted in the prison system becoming an industry. The war on drugs was responsible for a brimming population in the 80’s, and private companies became increasingly involved in aspects of the prison system throughout the decade. But it was not until the Corrections Corporation of America (now CoreCivic) was awarded a $200 million contract for the running of a complete prison facility in Tennessee in 1984 that privatisation really took hold. Through lobbying politicians, the failing war on drugs has continued as the prison industry grows, the two are unquestionably linked and toxically interwoven as generations of politicians turn a blind eye to what has essentially become a money making scam for the US government and prison system.

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Daniel Halliday
Nov 2
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DH edited this paragraph
The war on drugs has focussed too heavily on criminalisation and too lightly on rehabilitation. This has seen a dramatic growth in prison populations, with over 2 million people incarcerated currently, roughly a quarter of those are for drug offences. This population is thought to be driven by the estimated 6.8 million Americans struggling with drug dependance issues.
Yes, the legal status of drugs in the US is fuelling crime and corruption elsewhere

The US’ long standing 'war on drugs', and the heavy jail sentences and societal mismanagement that has gone along with it, is driving drugs underground dramatically, which is fuelling the multimillion dollar black market for drugs in the United States. This has lead to the proliferation of drug cartels that fund corruption and terrorise the populations of Mexico and other Central American countries. Joint reform should be pursued, and coordinated efforts need to be made on both sides of the border to deal with this huge problem.

Despite the war on drugs going back to the Nixon administration of the 1970’s the US remains the largest illegal drug market in the world. It has been estimated that Mexican drug cartels alone make around $10 billion in profit from selling drugs in the US. This money is channelled back into fuelling corruption in Mexico to the point of undermining the authority of the Mexican government and overwhelming police forces by decreasing their powers of enforcement, all the while making gangs, drug traffickers and producers wealthier.

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Daniel Halliday
Nov 2
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DH edited this paragraph
Despite the war on drugs going back to the Nixon administration of the 1970’s the US remains the largest illegal drug market in the world. It has been estimated that Mexican drug cartels alone make around $10 billion in profit from selling drugs in the US. This money is channelled back into fuelling corruption in Mexico to the point of undermining the authority of the Mexican government and overwhelming police forces by decreasing their powers of enforcement, all the while making gangs, drug traffickers and producers wealthier.
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