Daniel Halliday
Jul 2 · Last update 3 mo. ago.
Why is the War in Yemen so under reported in the mainstream media?
The civil war in Yemen has a death toll amounting to 8-13,000 casualties, and has displaced over three million people since 2015. For such terrible circumstances, why has there been relatively little media coverage?
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The UN’s report accusing both sides of war crimes should help shed light on this humanitarian crisis
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Many conflicts are similarly under reported, Yemen is not an isolated case
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The number of casualties of the civil war in Syria far outstretches that of Yemen
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The media in many countries has actively played down their countries role in Yemen’s civil war
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The Media is a profit making organisation
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The UN’s report accusing both sides of war crimes should help shed light on this humanitarian crisis

The media has struggled to depict this multi-party internal conflict between the government and rebel forces in different governorates of the country. With Al-Qaeda playing a prominent role in the conflict also, and US drone strikes against Al-Qaeda being prevalent before the outbreak of full-scale civil war, this is a truly complex situation. To complicate the matter further Houthi rebels claim the government is affiliated with Al-Qaeda, and the Hadi government likewise accused the Houthi’s of an Iranian connection. The US seemingly backed the Saudi coalition in a response to allegations of this Iranian support for the Houthi rebels. This made the situation more complicated and difficult for the media to portray accurately. But following repeated Saudi air strikes on civilian regions, the call for a cessation of violence in the media has grown. This has been boosted by the UN’s (rather late) report accusing both sides of war crimes, and lead to a resurgence of media coverage, that will hopefully lead to a public outcry in America and Britain to cease Saudi military support.

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Many conflicts are similarly under reported, Yemen is not an isolated case

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has been in a state of instability since the early 1990’s. The Ituri conflict is the most recent flare up in a long line of conflicts in the DRC, with rural ethnic conflicts becoming increasingly violent. NGOs such as the Norwegian Refugee Council that are currently stationed in the DRC have reported that “the big wars of the Congo that were really on top of the agenda 15 years ago are back and worsening”. Due to the violence taking place between farmers and herders of different ethnic backgrounds, the UN has speculated that the tension could put two million children at risk of starvation. Yet there is next to no mainstream news coverage...

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The number of casualties of the civil war in Syria far outstretches that of Yemen

There has been somewhat limited coverage of Yemen’s latest civil war in the mainstream media. But the war in Syria has further reaching implications especially regarding the issue of immigration of asylum seekers into the Euro-zone. The situation is Syria has been further complicated by the presence of ISIS and has lead more international parties to become involved in the war. Nearly half a million have died in Syria and over 7 million have become displaced. In Yemen over 60,000 people have died and over 3 million are displaced. The news coverage, usually divided by geographical region, will reflect this and therefore international news coverage has dedicated more time to covering Syria.

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Daniel Halliday
Jul 31
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DH edited this paragraph
There has been somewhat limited coverage of Yemen’s latest civil war in the mainstream media. But the war in Syria has further reaching implications especially regarding the issue of immigration of asylum seekers into the Euro-zone. The situation is Syria has been further complicated by the presence of ISIS and has lead more international parties to become involved in the war. Nearly half a million have died in Syria and over 7 million have become displaced. In Yemen over 60,000 people have died and over 3 million are displaced. The news coverage, usually divided by geographical region, will reflect this and therefore international news coverage has dedicated more time to covering Syria.
The media in many countries has actively played down their countries role in Yemen’s civil war

As the civil war now features a Saudi-lead coalition funded by governments such as the US and the UK, coverage in these regions has been scant. This coalitions tactics of large scale indiscriminate bombing of civilian areas is arguably worse than what have been seen in Syria or Iraq. At such a touch and go time where trust in the government is low in both Trump-era America and Brexit-era Britain, anything that could possibly cause the reader to question their countries relationship to a close ally could be seen as disastrous. Therefore the news media focuses on stories that will not undermine the status quo as much, or cause further anger towards their governments.

The media have been historically the ones to question the government and big businesses, but as the media have become such a global corporate entity itself, its role has shifted to a much more self serving one, and its relationship to big businesses and government figures has changed the type of content and the amount of certain content that they are publishing.

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Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Jul 31
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
The media have been historically the ones to question the government and big businesses, but as the media have become such a global corporate entity itself, its role has shifted to a much more self serving one, and its relationship to big businesses and government figures has changed the type of content and the amount of certain content that they are publishing.
The Media is a profit making organisation

To make profit from news, mainstream new corporations have to somewhat sensationalise stories in order to engage possible buyers (customers/readers/viewers). This is especially apparent now in the age of the internet, where people are buying less newsprint, and news companies are vying for clicks in a much larger market. Clickbait journalism and sensationalism, and sometimes fake news is being thrown around. This environment has left some of the mainstream media focussing their attention of popular issues and becoming less impartial, and has lead many news organisations to the large scale dumbing down of content. These three things have all contributed to a more patchy and biased news coverage by the mainstream media, and this has definitely effected coverage of stories such as Yemen’s.

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Jul 31
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
To make profit from news, mainstream new corporations have to somewhat sensationalise stories in order to engage possible buyers (customers/readers/viewers). This is especially apparent now in the age of the internet, where people are buying less newsprint, and news companies are vying for clicks in a much larger market. Clickbait journalism and sensationalism, and sometimes fake news is being thrown around. This environment has left some of the mainstream media focussing their attention of popular issues and becoming less impartial, and has lead many news organisations to the large scale dumbing down of content. These three things have all contributed to a more patchy and biased news coverage by the mainstream media, and this has definitely effected coverage of stories such as Yemen’s.
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