Daniel Halliday
Dec 30 · Last update 2 mo. ago.
Should Britain pay reparations for colonialism in India?
The effect of British colonialism is mixed and consequently hotly debated, but with the many negative effects taking such a massive economic and human toll in India, is it time for the UK government to start paying some form of reparations for the exploitative British colonisation of India? Picture: Taken during the Bengal famine 1943, Source: Wikipedia
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Reparations need to be made, but not just India
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No, it is too complex a history to pay reparations for
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Reparations need to be made
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Reparations need to be made, but not just India

While the debate of reparations made to India remains contested the subject of reparations for Britain’s part in the slave trade remains mostly ignored. Multiple calls and various lawsuits have been made for greater recognition and reparations to be made by Britain, but any meaningful response remains elusive. Despite the country making four trillion pounds around the slave trade, with many UK cities and businesses being built on slave trading, reparations were only ever made to slave traders for loss of property following the abolition of slavery. Why were the survivors never compensated?

CARICOM is an organisation with members of fifteen nations in and around the Caribbean to promote cooperative economic policies in the region, pushing for reparations for slavery through the CARICOM Reparations Commission (CRC). The CRC asserts that multiple European governments were instrumental in the enslavement and trade of Africans, carrying out native genocide against various peoples and continued various racial apartheid policies following the emancipation of those slave populations generations later. The slave trade was not a mutually beneficial thing in any way, with culture; language and identity being completely destroyed for those caught up in the trade, and this, as one of the worst chapters of history, needs to be compensated.

theguardian.com/world/2015/sep/30/british-slavery-reparations-qa caricomreparations.org/caricom/caricoms-10-point-reparation-plan

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Daniel Halliday
May 19
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DH edited this paragraph
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/sep/30/british-slavery-reparations-qa http://caricomreparations.org/caricom/caricoms-10-point-reparation-plan/
No, it is too complex a history to pay reparations for

The long history of British colonial involvement in India is complex, and it is therefore hard to put a price to something such as the damages caused by British imperialism. This issue is made more complicated by the fact that British rule in India wasn’t entirely a negative exchange, with culture moving both ways and modernisation and infrastructure being put into place under the British Raj also. In addition it wasn’t the case of British East India Company and the subsequent British Crown setting up an exploitative colonial system, but merely taking over a rigid exploitative class system from the previous Mughal Empire.

In 1600’s the British East India Company received a Royal Charter from Queen Elizabeth I to commence trade in Asia. They followed Portuguese and Dutch companies that had already established trade here. So although comparatively late, British colonialism began at the start of an era of European colonialism, with moral values not being what they are today, Europeans carried on a similar harsh rule that may have been the norm in many places and was typical of European history as they began to become involved in politics as well as trade. This is a time when human rights were not recognised anywhere, before the English Bill of Rights, a time of wide spread autocratic rule and before democracy was viewed as it is in a modern sense, it is dangerous then to judge this period with a modern moral outlook.

forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2013/07/26/we-british-would-be-delighted-to-accept-reparations-for-the-slave-trade-and-slavery

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Daniel Halliday
May 18
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DH edited this paragraph
In 1600’s the British East India Company received a Royal Charter from Queen Elizabeth I to commence trade in Asia. They followed Portuguese and Dutch companies that had already established trade here. So although comparatively late, British colonialism began at the start of an era of European colonialism, with moral values not being what they are today, Europeans carried on a similar harsh rule that may have been the norm in many places and was typical of European history as they began to become involved in politics as well as trade. This is a time when human rights were not recognised anywhere, before the English Bill of Rights, a time of wide spread autocratic rule and before democracy was viewed as it is in a modern sense, it is dangerous then to judge this period with a modern moral outlook.
Reparations need to be made

The British Empire from the onset of East India Company rule of the region and throughout the time of the British Raj caused massive levels of economic, social and humanitarian damage to the country. Failed economic and agricultural policies of British Rule in India led to a series of famines that claimed the lives of 15 to 55 million people. Combined with the direct violence carried out through land acquisition, social mismanagement worsening ethnic tensions, and the economical aggression of debt slavery; there was a very direct human and economic cost to British Imperialism in India.

Famine was a reoccurring theme of British rule in India, both when under the control of the East India Company and the British Crown. The failing economic policy of the British East India Company led hunger following a failed monsoon season in 1769 to become widespread starvation through prolonged exploitative tax policy even as the situation descended into famine. However a severe pattern of famines began to emerge as history repeated itself in 1783, 1866, 1873, 1892, 1897 and 1943/4, the majority caused by dry monsoon seasons and disastrous British responses to it. Reparations to compensate for this dark region in Indian and British history should unquestionably be made, if not to repay for damages made then at least as a symbol of British recognition of this crime of history.

yourstory.com/2014/08/bengal-famine-genocide allthatsinteresting.com/bengal-famine

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Daniel Halliday
May 18
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DH edited this paragraph
Famine was a reoccurring theme of British rule in India, both when under the control of the East India Company and the British Crown. The failing economic policy of the British East India Company led hunger following a failed monsoon season in 1769 to become widespread starvation through prolonged exploitative tax policy even as the situation descended into famine. However a severe pattern of famines began to emerge as history repeated itself in 1783, 1866, 1873, 1892, 1897 and 1943/4, the majority caused by dry monsoon seasons and disastrous British responses to it. Reparations to compensate for this dark region in Indian and British history should unquestionably be made, if not to repay for damages made then at least as a symbol of British recognition of this crime of history.
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