Radcliffe Takashi Onishi
Mar 28 · Last update 4 mo. ago.
Why did terrorism spread to Western Countries?
Why did terrorism spread to Western Countries?
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It's because developed countries cause.
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Terrorism didn’t spread to western countries, it came from them, and continues to...
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Due to a change in the Terrorist’s aims
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It's because developed countries cause.

In Middle Eastern countries, border lines were drawn by former colonial powers, regardless of ethnicity or religion. Outside forces have then backed leaders that have utilised violence and corruption to maintain power in these ethnically, religiously or tribally diverse places. This can be seen as far back as Britain’s post First World War backing of Abdullah I of Jordan and Faisal I of Iraq, or again during the Cold War with the Soviet Union installing Babrak Karmal in Afghanistan. To further complicate the situation these former colonial powers have then subseuently funded rebels that have risen up to fight these oppressive regimes.

Why else have western countries sent weapons and funds to terrorist groups? Is it because developed countries have been using local armed groups to their advantage, in order to take control of natural resources, in every war in the Middle East? Or could it be the overly simplified narrative, that neglects the nuances present in complex violent situations, and instead tries to export Western influence as a fix all solution to diplomatic and social problems around the world?

Either way, as a result of the actions of developed countries, terrorism has evolved and expanded. And as a result of these terrorist groups expanding they have also become able to sustain themselves economically, either through illegal trade (such as opium in Afghanistan) or occupation of resource rich areas (such as oil fields in Syria). This is allowing them to further their cause, rely less on international support, and thus further the role of terrorist attacks in the world.

When we consider the history of modern terrorism, especially extremist Islamic terrorism, it’s important to remember how it has evolved and where it has evolved from. Most groups involved have been at least historically funded or armed by former colonial powers as they carried out Cold War or neo-colonialist foreign policy.

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Daniel Halliday
Sep 3
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DH edited this paragraph
In Middle Eastern countries, border lines were drawn by former colonial powers, regardless of ethnicity or religion. Outside forces have then backed leaders that have utilised violence and corruption to maintain power in these ethnically, religiously or tribally diverse places. This can be seen as far back as Britain’s post First World War backing of Abdullah I of Jordan and Faisal I of Iraq, or again during the Cold War with the Soviet Union installing Babrak Karmal in Afghanistan. To further complicate the situation these former colonial powers have then subseuently funded rebels that have risen up to fight these oppressive regimes.
Terrorism didn’t spread to western countries, it came from them, and continues to...

Although modern terrorism was first established by the IRA, a new form of Fundamentalist Islamic Terrorism mutated in the Middle East and has spread back to the West. Arguably it’s a reaction to dodgy foreign policy, and is made more complicated by the injection of disillusioned young rebellious western born muslims.

The word terrorism goes back to the 18th century with the French Revolution. But it wasn’t until the late 19th century that Irish Republicans started carrying out modern terrorist attacks in England, using dynamite. These tactics were repeatedly involved in wars and terrorism alike for the next century with civilian targets becoming increasingly common.

Relations with Ireland became less violent throughout this time, but it was eventually disillusioned British-born terrorists that would orchestrate attacks and murders, and defect to terrorist organisations such as ISIS in the Middle East.

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Due to a change in the Terrorist’s aims

Although suicidal attacks have occurred throughout history, is it the adoption of these strategies by fundamentalist Islamic terrorists, and the large scale targeting of civilian populations that has been so horrifying in recent years. Terrorism and suicide bombings have long distinct histories, but they started to become common and intertwined in the Middle East in the 1980’s. Factions such as Hezbollah, The Islamic Dawa Party, the Amal Movement, Kurdistan Workers’ Party, The Ba’ath Party and the Syrian Social Nationalist Party all used such tactics against enemy forces and civilians alike throughout the Middle East.

Terrorists attacks and suicide bombings increased through the 90’s, but in 2001 Al-Qaeda hijacked planes, flying them into buildings in New York and Washington, changing terrorism and suicide attacks from then on. The terrorists that were fighting what they saw as an outside oppressive influences in their country, had bought this fight to their enemy’s soil. Other groups militants copied these tactics, but it wasn’t until ISIS, a terrorist organisation aiming to start a global Islamic Caliphate, that encouragement to use any method necessary was espoused in order to bring terror to “the West”.

Al-Qaeda’s aim was to remove western influence from the Middle East, whereas ISIS adhere to a more extreme Salafi/Wahhabi form of global jihad that even views Muslims who disagree with there violent methods as infidels. Terrorism has evolved alongside suicide bombings and modern terror tactics, and the move of Middle Eastern terrorist groups targeting the US and Western Europe is due to an evolution in those groups objectives of a global caliphate.

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