Daniel Halliday
Jul 2 · Last update 3 mo. ago.
Should religious groups enjoy tax exempt status?
Religious groups such as the Roman Catholic Church and Scientology enjoy tax free status in many countries, while amassing multi-million dollar fortunes around the world. Should this be allowed?
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No, times have changed they should contribute to society or prove their NPO status
1 agrees
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Yes, in order to keep church and state separate
0 agrees
0 disagrees
No, and vows of poverty should be legally binding
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Yes, they are in essence charitable organisations and intertwined with such organisations
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No, times have changed they should contribute to society or prove their NPO status

Churches should be taxed on money used as income and donations over a certain threshold. The laws currently in place are antiquated, and in a technological age where financial transactions can be more open and clear, questionable funding of a state by a religious group should be less of an issue.

From data released by the US Federal Election Commission we can see that political contributions made by religious group have grown massively over the last 30 years. This amounted to multiple million dollar contributions over the last ten years. It can be of no coincidence then that this pattern mimics both the bolstering of the “religious right” in American politics. But it could also be argued that it may we responsible for the recent centre right shift of the Democrat Party, as religious contributions remain high for both major US parties.

opensecrets.org/industries/indus.php?ind=W05

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 30
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DH edited this paragraph
Churches should be taxed on money used as income and donations over a certain threshold. The laws currently in place are antiquated, and in a technological age where financial transactions can be more open and clear, questionable funding of a state by a religious group should be less of an issue.
Yes, in order to keep church and state separate

In some countries, such as Germany, Finland and Iceland religious groups receive tax payments, deducted from taxpayers to fund their organisation, in order to facilitate the separation of church and state. In countries such as the US, it is against the constitution for any tax or state owned money to go to a religious group, so likewise they enjoy tax free status. The reasoning behind this is similarly separation of church and state. This has lead to groups and individuals to profit massively from this situation. But the danger of religions providing monetary support to political candidates to too worrying to change that.

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No, and vows of poverty should be legally binding

In other countries like Croatia, the the state funds the Roman Catholic Church with a large payments and other benefits being made between the Croatian government and the Vatican. Most religious workers (priests, monks, pastors, nuns) have taken a vow of poverty. Why do most religions end up with large assets and savings despite preaching against this. If these vows are taken seriously they would donate all excess money and put it into funding good causes. Religious groups amassing large sums of money should be illegal.

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Yes, they are in essence charitable organisations and intertwined with such organisations

Religious groups deserve some money to be able to exist as a cultural freedom. As these groups in essence rely on charitable donations, they should enjoy the same benefits as charitable organisations. Its not the fault of that religious group how generous there members are. Really it just shows that they are an affective religion if they are inspiring charitable actions in there congregation.

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