Daniel Halliday
Sep 1 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

Is there a need for constitutional reform in the UK?

The UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has recently asked Queen Elizabeth II to suspended parliament, known as prorogation, to prevent members of Parliament (MPs) from blocking a no-deal Brexit. This action has been described as a coup by many who feel Johnson has taken the country’s democratic system hostage to exercise his own will following years of government failure in reaching a consensus on how Britain should exit from the European Union. As faith is rapidly being lost in UK politics this is causing many to look for the underlying causes of this failure, some are pointing to the country’s reliance on an unwritten constitution and suggesting a codified constitution, which is normal for most democracies, could help modernise this archaic electoral system. Does the Brexit deadlock or the recent prorogation of Parliament reveal a need for constitutional reform in the UK? Or is there another way to reform UK politics and turn something positive out of this political calamity?
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Could have aided the Brexit process
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No, not the time and never popular
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Could have aided the Brexit process

Constitutional reform in the UK may have actually helped the Brexit process and given the number of constitutional and political crises the country faced for the last few years, the lack of a written constitution in the face of these problems really stresses that one is needed. The process has gone on far longer than original, or the many rescheduled, deadline/s and reforming the government and opposition model could help solve this stalemate of bickering that doesn’t go anywhere and foster more cooperation in parliament. Constitutional reforms could have also given a better framework to enact referendums and blocked certain actions such as Boris Johnson’s use of the Queen to bypass parliament to try and force through a ‘no-deal’ Brexit in September 2019. But it’s likely that constitutional reform will still be an advantage to Britain moving forward after Brexit, as Scotland, and possibly Northern Ireland, may seek independence or devolution constitutional reform may prove to be a must for the UK.

express.co.uk/news/uk/1154465/Boris-Johnson-news-Brexit-no-deal-Andrea-Leadsom-Parliament-UK-EU-withdrawal-latest opb.org/news/article/npr-britains-prime-minister-asks-queen-to-suspend-parliament-ahead-of-brexit-deadline brexitcentral.com/here-are-the-constitutional-questions-that-brexit-britain-must-face-in-the-2020s independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/the-big-question-why-doesnt-the-uk-have-a-written-constitution-and-does-it-matter-781975.html

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Daniel Halliday
Dec 23
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No, not the time and never popular

The system of governance established in Westminster is one of the oldest forms of continuous democracy in the world; it has become part of the identity of this country that has historically exported democracy to many parts of the world and for this reason alone it should be conserved. There are some reforms to the country’s constitution already ongoing, in the form of the Governance of Britain process launched by Gordon Brown in 2007, but wider scale reforms have been unpopular in the UK as can be seen with the rejection of election reform in the 2011 UK Alternative Vote referendum. If current MP’s cannot deliver Brexit, why would they be any better at delivering working constitutional reforms? This system is best left alone by the current UK parliament as all efforts are put into the most present issue here.

theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/may/06/reasons-av-referendum-lost

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Daniel Halliday
Sep 2
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