D H
Oct 29, 2018 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

How can we mitigate the damages caused by Tsunamis?

Earthquakes and tsunamis are responsible for the deadliest natural disasters in recorded human history, what measures can be taken to reduce the harm caused by these destructive forces?
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Move people
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Escape is the most realistic option to minimise the loss of life
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Clear evacuation routes
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Tsunami proof technology
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Move people

The only real form of mitigation for Tsunami would be for people to be moved from where tsunamis have hit historically bearing in mind that there is no real way to be prepared enough for a natural disaster as destructive as a Tsunami. Any reason for people to returning to these areas should be discouraged or regulated by governments to make them as safe as possible, only allowing returning for farming but not to establish residence. But it is clear from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster that nuclear power plants are the most important thing to relocate away form tsunami risk zones. We need better cooperation globally so that energy can be sold and shared where possible and nuclear power can be generated only in areas where water is abundant for cooling, as is needed by nuclear power, but also where there is absolutely zero risk of tsunami.

bom.gov.au/tsunami/history/index.shtml journalistsresource.org/environment/relocation-climate-change-flooding-research large.stanford.edu/courses/2017/ph241/uhm1/docs/prevention_2013.pdf

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D H
Nov 7
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Escape is the most realistic option to minimise the loss of life

Tsunamis are unfortunately incredible destructive forces, and it is hard to even predict the wave height from the measurements we can make with modern seismograph technology. The difficulty in predicting the occurrence, the scale and the level of destruction of a tsunami leaves escape as the only real credible option when mitigating the damages to human lives in the case of such disasters. There are technologies however such as the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (or DART II) system, which detect pressure changes on the seafloor in order to help predict and warn people of an impending tsunami.

nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/Dart australiangeographic.com.au/topics/science-environment/2012/05/tsunami-warning-why-prediction-is-so-hard kqed.org/quest/24915/up-up-and-away-escaping-a-tsunami-vertically

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D H
Nov 7
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DH edited this paragraph
Tsunamis are unfortunately incredible destructive forces, and it is hard to even predict the wave height from the measurements we can make with modern seismograph technology. The difficulty in predicting the occurrence, the scale and the level of destruction of a tsunami leaves escape as the only real credible option when mitigating the damages to human lives in the case of such disasters. There are technologies however such as the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (or DART II) system, which detect pressure changes on the seafloor in order to help predict and warn people of an impending tsunami.

Clear evacuation routes

In countries or areas that have been struck by Tsunami it is common to see danger zones and evacuation routes clearly sign posted as the tsunami risk is considered higher in these areas. Likewise in countries such as Japan, where Tsunami’s a relatively frequent, clear marking of how high previous tsunamis went, the inundation height, is common, and helps to demonstrate how far you are likely to have to go before reaching safety. Routes to near by tsunami-proof buildings could also prove useful if there is a structure such as this in the vicinity.

espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:203103 reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/214734e.pdf

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D H
Nov 7
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DH edited this paragraph
https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:203103 https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/214734e.pdf

Tsunami proof technology

Natural disasters are an inevitable and unpredictable fact of life in many regions of the world, with technology offering one of the only realistic lifelines in boosting preparedness. Following the 2004 Indonesian Tsunami that killed around 225,000 people, US Aeronautical Engineer Julian Sharpe came up with a design for a tsunami-proof “Survival Capsule”. The idea was to provide a container that can house 2-10 people and withstand the destructive force of a natural disaster such as a tsunami, tornado, hurricane, earthquake or major flood, offering those with limited mobility a realistic option of escape. His prototype received positive feedback at the Yokohama disaster Preparedness Exposition of 2013 and the Survival Capsule has since gone into production.

youtube.com/watch?v=5rBkOXdm45k redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/tsunami.html australiangeographic.com.au/topics/science-environment/2011/03/the-10-most-destructive-tsunamis-in-history iotic.ioc-unesco.org/indian-ocean-tsunami-warning-system/16/what-is-iotws unisdr.org/we/inform/publications/43291 un.org/en/events/tsunamiday

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D H
Nov 7
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DH edited this paragraph
Natural disasters are an inevitable and unpredictable fact of life in many regions of the world, with technology offering one of the only realistic lifelines in boosting preparedness. Following the 2004 Indonesian Tsunami that killed around 225,000 people, US Aeronautical Engineer Julian Sharpe came up with a design for a tsunami-proof “Survival Capsule”. The idea was to provide a container that can house 2-10 people and withstand the destructive force of a natural disaster such as a tsunami, tornado, hurricane, earthquake or major flood, offering those with limited mobility a realistic option of escape. His prototype received positive feedback at the Yokohama disaster Preparedness Exposition of 2013 and the Survival Capsule has since gone into production.
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