Daniel Halliday
May 12 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

What led to the end of apartheid?

Recently the African National Congress took their narrowest victory in a South African election since the end of apartheid, let’s take a look back and remember what led to the end of apartheid and what should the ruling ANC be taking from this dark period in history moving forward?
Stats of Viewpoints
Apartheid died for economic reasons but its ghost lives on
0 agrees
0 disagrees
International anti-apartheid movement
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Mandela and the ANC
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Viewpoints
Add New Viewpoint

Apartheid died for economic reasons but its ghost lives on

Despite numerous international efforts to impose sanctions and arms embargoes on South Africa in order to isolate and pressure an end to apartheid in the country, it was the economic contradictions of apartheid South Africa that began to open the way for the end of apartheid. Apartheid had helped generate a stratified peasant labour force in the country that produced short term profitability but failed to form a manufacturing industry in the country, it was this economic limitation that led to debate over the implications of the country’s racial policy. These pressures were amplified by international sanctions on the country that eventually led to the end of apartheid, but many believe that apartheid lives on in modern day South Africa, a country that is still strictly divided economically speaking down racial lines, and seemingly becoming even more sharply divided over time despite ANC dominance.

theafricanfile.com/politicshistory/impact-of-economic-and-political-sanctions-on-apartheid foreignaffairs.com/reviews/capsule-review/1990-03-01/economics-apartheid nytimes.com/2017/10/24/business/south-africa-economy-apartheid.html

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Oct 21
Created

International anti-apartheid movement

The international movement against apartheid in South Africa included sanctions and a protest movement for change around the world and ultimately turned opinion against apartheid and helped lead the country to reform. Nelson Mandela himself has stated how much of an effect this international support had on the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa and has personally thanked American activists such as Ron Dellums. It was such a controversial subject that when Congress approved The Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act in 1986 President Ronald Reagan’s vetoed the law, only to have his veto overrode by Congress days later, which subsequently influenced Europe and Japan to take similar action. This pressure ultimately led to President F. W. De Klerk making an effort to meet the conditions in the Anti-Apartheid Act in the early 90s and beginning the transition to end apartheid.

voanews.com/usa/us-anti-apartheid-movement-helped-bring-change-south-africa

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Jun 28
Created

Mandela and the ANC

Nelson Mandela joined the ANC in 1943 after moving to Johannesburg to work at a law firm, through leading a civil protest movement and repeatedly protesting apartheid Mandela was arrested many times for various charges until he was arrested in 1956 for “high treason”. Following this charge Mandela joined the banned South African Communist Party in 1961 and founded a military branch attempting to acquire weapons from China to violently overthrow the National Party’s apartheid government. Mandela spent 27 years jailed as political and civil pressure grew in the country. Fears of a racial civil war led President Fredrik Willem de Klerk to release Mandela from prison in 1990, as the two then started a campaign to end apartheid which directly led to Mandela becoming the country’s first black president, in the country’s first multiracial general election in 1994.

reconciliationsofnations.com/2018/10/09/nelson-mandela-south-african-apartheid

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
May 12
Created
Translate