Daniel Halliday
Jun 4 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

What can the invention of mechanised looms during the industrial revolution teach us about the dangers of automation and AI?

The power loom was an invention of the early Industrial Revolution; it changed the very fabric of the textile industry, having both positive and negative outcomes. What can this very transitionary period of history teach us about the pending automation and artificial intelligence revolution we are on the verge of?
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The divide between rich and poor will become even larger
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Nothing, two very different transitions
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The divide between rich and poor will become even larger

Even prior to the industrial revolution, those who owned the land or means of production became increasing rich from the work of others and held power over those who laboured as a result. It is a very different world now from the turn of the industrial revolution, not so much due to a technological change but a population one, and inequality in society is stronger than it has ever been. So what becomes of the majority, what will happen to the labour market when the owners of AI or automation technology need less and less workers, as the global population continues to expand? Jut like the industrial revolution, this isn’t a problem that needs fighting against, nor is it a problem that can be ignored, this needs legislating against to not reach catastrophic proportions, as population makes this a much more complex issue compared to the industrial revolution. Labour needs change with industrial growth, and some better method of looking after those who cannot work needs to be sought moving forward, as this will eventually become the majority.

artificialintelligence-news.com/2018/01/11/ai-wealth-inequality

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Daniel Halliday
Sep 5
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Nothing, two very different transitions

Starting in the 18th century and accelerating in the 19th century the weaving industry became increasingly mechanised as power looms took over from hand weaving, leaving many weavers in states of poverty and unemployment. The social and economic implications of the industrial revolution on the weaving industry alone led to the Carlton weaver riots in Scotland and the Luddite protest movement in England, who actively sought to destroy textile machinery in protest of losing they way of life. However the two transitions were very different, the new machines of the industrial revolution still needed operating, but the current, so called, fourth industrial revolution may largely bypass the labour force altogether leading to mass job losses across sectors. This could threaten society with much larger rates of unemployment and poverty, for a much wider cross section of the work force in both the developed and developing world.

nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/politics/g3

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Daniel Halliday
Jun 5
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