Daniel Halliday
Jul 15 · Last update 3 mo. ago.
Should there be age restrictions on positions of power?
Recently, the Polish government have reformed the mandatory retirement age for Supreme Court judges, doing so they have been accused by EU parliament members of an anti-democratic purge of government opposition judges. But should positions such as this, and in government, be subject to tighter age restrictions? As older people tend to have a more conservative bias, can the current situation sometimes be at odds with progress?
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Changes towards the future should be made by the people those changes will effect
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This constitutes age discrimination and be a waste of valuable experience
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This argument could equally be made towards young people
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Age restrictions are shortsighted, there should be shorter and stricter term restrictions
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Changes towards the future should be made by the people those changes will effect

We are currently in a system were policies are passed by one government and undone by the next, it is counter productive and gets in the way of progress. With looming issues such as climate change and war, inaction and slow decision making are they worst threats to future stability. We need governments that are young, dynamic and forward thinking, policies and age requirements should reflect that.

While technological breakthroughs are common nowadays, changes in society based on government policy have been allowed to grind to a slow pace. Most developed nations have arguably entered into a period of policy stagnation, with successive governments just back tracking any previous progress made. This policy pingpong game continues, in a system where the decision makers will not even be around to see the future their policy creates. These crucial decisions should be made by young people that not only have their children's future invested, but their own also.

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 29
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DH edited this paragraph
While technological breakthroughs are common nowadays, changes in society based on government policy have been allowed to grind to a slow pace. Most developed nations have arguably entered into a period of policy stagnation, with successive governments just back tracking any previous progress made. This policy pingpong game continues, in a system where the decision makers will not even be around to see the future their policy creates. These crucial decisions should be made by young people that not only have their children's future invested, but their own also.
This constitutes age discrimination and be a waste of valuable experience

Part of being an open, fair and democratic society depends upon minimising unfair discrimination towards certain groups in a society. Age restrictions are unfair to people who have a positive input they could make towards society, and this cannot be evaluated on age alone. Having age restrictions to encourage a higher proportion of younger people to hold positions of power would also be a waste of the valid on-the-job experience older people tend to bring to those positions.

This case in Poland was just a political alignment issue with the government trying to unfairly gain further control of the legal system. It is arguably more damaging to the smooth running of a country, or a countries legal system, to exclude people who have proved to be fit for office. This may scare off talented lawyers, diplomats and politicians, who may seek out other more stable positions.

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 29
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DH edited this paragraph
This case in Poland was just a political alignment issue with the government trying to unfairly gain further control of the legal system. It is arguably more damaging to the smooth running of a country, or a countries legal system, to exclude people who have proved to be fit for office. This may scare off talented lawyers, diplomats and politicians, who may seek out other more stable positions.
This argument could equally be made towards young people

If there is any age restrictions that could be placed on positions of power, it should be on younger people. Younger people tend to be unrealistic, idealistic and do not have a balanced objective view of society. This stems from the large number of younger people that are not fully contributing members of society yet, some have never had a job, many responsibilities, or have never paid taxes.

Furthermore the brains of young people actually function differently. The prefrontal cortex of the human brain, the area associated with executive decision making, does not fully develop until the age of 25 years old in the average adult. This executive decision making process includes determining good and bad, better and best, same and different, future consequences of current actions, prediction of outcomes, and expectation based on actions. All of which are attributes that help an individual make an informed decision. It would therefore be beneficial to limit the age of positions of power to those potential candidates who's brain has reached full maturity, when it is scientifically proven to be able to process the nuances of complicated political, social, and legal matters.

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 28
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DH edited this paragraph
Furthermore the brains of young people actually function differently. The prefrontal cortex of the human brain, the area associated with executive decision making, does not fully develop until the age of 25 years old in the average adult. This executive decision making process includes determining good and bad, better and best, same and different, future consequences of current actions, prediction of outcomes, and expectation based on actions. All of which are attributes that help an individual make an informed decision. It would therefore be beneficial to limit the age of positions of power to those potential candidates who's brain has reached full maturity, when it is scientifically proven to be able to process the nuances of complicated political, social, and legal matters.
Age restrictions are shortsighted, there should be shorter and stricter term restrictions

Thomas Jefferson wrote limits to tenure are imperative “to prevent every danger which might arise to American freedom by continuing too long in office”. This was a common sentiment in 18th century US politics, where spending too long in politics was seen as a corrupting force on a persons character. The idea of rotation placed on positions of power was seen as a lesson to be learned from classical civilisation, a tool to help to prevent corruption.

Governments have since become too large and self serving, run by too many career politicians. We need to be stricter on terms elected officials hold positions for in general to allow a larger turn over of people with fresh ideas. This would also help to minimise the number of self-serving career politicians. Politicians that play some part in increasing bureaucracy and stand in the way of effectiveness or progress. Politicians that may favour pro-corporate policy over pro-constituent policy, benefit from either special corporate business relationships or directly from corporate campaign contributions, and subsequently prolong their position in government.

books.google.co.jp/books?isbn=0895265168 (Page 111)

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 28
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DH edited this paragraph
https://books.google.co.jp/books?isbn=0895265168 (Page 111)
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