Policymaking > Government > Country
Daniel Halliday
Jul 6 · Last update 11 days ago.
Should Japan relax its immigration laws?
With Japan facing an ageing population and a lowering birth rate that threaten to further complicate an already volatile economy, should Japan be loosening the restrictions on it’s strict immigration laws?
Stats of Viewpoints
Japan needs to utilise this misunderstood long term resource
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Japan is too distinctive and culturally homogenous
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Immigration should be further utilised, but strictly controlled to protect migrants & society alike
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Japan needs to boost its humanitarian efforts
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Viewpoints
Add New Viewpoint
Japan needs to utilise this misunderstood long term resource

With the issues of migration and refugees being such a hotly debated topic in Europe and America the implications have been widely misunderstood or misrepresented. Although immigration can have an initial cost to a country, the long term boosts immigration poses economically are far reaching. In a country that is having to contend with an ageing population, low birth rate, economic stagnation, a labour shortage and the highest debt to GDP ratio in the world, Japan needs to change there policy on this issue that could at least ease all of these problems.

Agree
Disagree
Japan is too distinctive and culturally homogenous

Due to thousands of years as a closed country coupled with its geographic isolation, Japan has a unique but complex culture. It is difficult for people to become accustomed to this cultural complexity, and homogeneity further complicates the matter as culturally strict expectations exist also. Immigration is therefore a difficult issue and may cause a backlash if Japanese society was subject to different influences that they are not accustomed to. For example any inconvenience or tension caused by language, difference of work ethic, customer service standards, or temperament.

Agree
Disagree
Immigration should be further utilised, but strictly controlled to protect migrants & society alike

As Shinzo Abe pledges to increase immigration by 2025 to address the labour shortage it is important to keep in mind past failures, as to not repeat history. The Technical Intern Training Program was set up in the 90’s to attract interns to Japan from developing countries to address the shortage of low skilled labour. The idea was to provide training and technical skills on the job, however the scheme has been criticised for failing to deliver these skills and subsided into more of a guest worker program. Further reports of labour rights violations and health and safety issues are common and have even lead to an interns death in an extreme case.

Agree
Disagree
Japan needs to boost its humanitarian efforts

Japan has famously low asylum seeker acceptance statistics, despite being the third largest economy in the world. Accepting refugees, in times of great civil unrest in large parts of the Middle East, is the international humanitarian standard Japan should be setting for the world.

Agree
Disagree
Translate