Daniel Halliday
Aug 15 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

What led to the Falklands War and what effect did it have on both nations?

During 1982 the Argentine military invaded and occupied the Falkland Islands to establish its claim of sovereignty over the territory. This prompted the British Navy to launch an amphibious assault on the islands and defend its claim over the islands as British dependent territories. Despite over ten weeks of conflict and the deaths of over 900 people neither side officially declared war. What led to this unusual situation and what were the lasting effects on both countries?
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A needless conflict of political origins
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An elaborate history and an Argentine dictatorship
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A needless conflict of political origins

Argentina has long viewed the territories of the Falklands, South Georgia, and the South Sandwich Islands as geographically their own, but it wasn’t until an expansionist military junta took power that an invasion of the islands went ahead. The British snatched the territory in 1833 following the failure of the young United Provinces of the Río de la Plata, which late became Argentina, to respond to the United Kingdom over a dispute of fishing rights. The Falklands War was used or was at least serendipitous in the UK and allowed Margaret Thatcher a huge boost in popularity, and in standing internationally, probably helping secure her re-election as Prime Minister in 1983. Argentinians have mostly seen the Falklands War as an unnecessary loss of life forced on to them by the ruling military government, but the political indulgence of the British government has fed into a long lasting animosity toward the UK for most Argentinians.

warhistoryonline.com/instant-articles/the-argentinian-side-falklands-m.html theguardian.com/politics/2013/apr/09/margaret-thatcher-falklands-gamble

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Daniel Halliday
Nov 17
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An elaborate history and an Argentine dictatorship

The French were the first to inhabit the harsh landscape of the Falklands, however the territory repeatedly changed hands between 1764 and 1833 becoming Spanish, then English, before being returned to Spain, only to be finally be occupied by the British in 1833. Argentine borders were not yet draw up by this time with the country only forming a full confederation with a government, military and president by 1862. However, through successive nationalist and anti-imperial military leaders following the Second World War the issue reached turmoil in 1982, when General Leopoldo Galtieri’s government launched a military invasion of the islands, causing the Falklands War. The Argentine dictatorship, through trying to manipulate public opinion, ignited this pointless and useless confrontation that ended the live of hundreds of people, the effect of which bolstered the conservative government of Margret Thatcher, but continues to be more culturally and politically significant in Argentina.

telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/southamerica/falklandislands/9069338/Argentina-has-no-more-claim-to-the-Falklands-than-Canada-does-to-Alaska.html theguardian.com/news/2003/jan/13/guardianobituaries.argentina

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 16
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