Daniel Halliday
Mar 18 · Last update 6 mo. ago.

What was the Monroe Doctrine?

The Monroe Doctrine has recently been bought up during discussions of US foreign policies. What does this 19th century American policy have to do with modern politics? How has its use, and how have views of this policy, changed over time?
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Still relevant for US foreign policy
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Imperialism reinterpretations
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An American effort to prevent reestablishment of European colonialism in the American continent
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Still relevant for US foreign policy

It is not just the recent reference to this by the Trump administration that makes this policy relevant, the Monroe Doctrine has come into play repeatedly in US history and is integral to the security of the America’s as a whole. It was used originally to oppose perceived threats to US security and is still being used in this way, and is wholly necessary to address current threats to the United States such as Russia. Russia is entitled to side with states such as Venezuela or Iran, regardless of their geographic proximity, even though this is a clear effort to antagonise the United States. In much the same way the United States is also entitled to stand up for its long held position of supporting democracy and human rights internationally and counteract the often negative effect the foreign policy of states such as Russia can have internationally.

theamericanconservative.com/larison/what-the-monroe-doctrine-was

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Daniel Halliday
Jun 7
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Imperialism reinterpretations

The Monroe doctrine is such a dated piece of United States foreign policy that some have argued that it needs a modern reinterpretation when used to justify action in a contemporary context. Historians such as William Appleman Williams and Jay Sexton have argued that, even historically, how the Monroe doctrine was utilised remained modelled on British imperialism and evolved into a form of ‘imperial anti-colonialism’. As so much has changed since, it is arguably not the same world, there is no threat to South America from Europe, and to use or reference this antiquated policy is a joke of modern foreign policy, and is more of an excuse for the United States to interfere with other states in the America.

books.google.co.jp/books?id=u4GVKXN8SWYC&printsec=frontcover&dq=imperial+anti-colonialism&hl=en&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=imperial%20anti-colonialism&f=false books.google.co.jp/books?id=tzAC75P9sscC&pg=PA64&dq=noam+chomsky+hegemony+or+survival+doctrine+declaration+of+hegemony&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=noam%20chomsky%20hegemony%20or%20survival%20doctrine%20declaration%20of%20hegemony&f=false

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Daniel Halliday
May 3
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An American effort to prevent reestablishment of European colonialism in the American continent

The Monroe Doctrine was put into motion in 1832 in an era of Central and South American independence from European powers, and represents a clear effort to bring European imperialism in the Americas to an end. The US government feared European powers asserted their influence in the Americas, as these newly independent states could be dragged back into European wars or even the ground for further European proxy wars, an unsettling prospect for a post-revolution United States. The policy was named after President James Monroe but was largely formulated by John Quincey Adams, clearly stating that the US will not interfere with existing colonies, but any European efforts to do so to independent states within the American continent will be taken as a unfriendly disposition toward the US. britannica.com/event/Monroe-Doctrine

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Daniel Halliday
Mar 19
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