Daniel Halliday
May 27 · Last update 4 mo. ago.

Can the UK’s Brexit Party solve the deadlock of Brexit?

The Brexit Party have by far achieved the greatest victory in the UK’s latest EU elections, despite only being established 6 months ago. With the Liberal Democrats coming second and the Green Party out-performing the Conservatives, the UK’s two historically most popular parties Labour and ruling Conservative Party have lost a large amount of public support. If the Brexit Party enjoys a similar victory in the country’s next general election can Nigel Farage and the Brexit Party solve the stalemate of Britain’s exit from the EU? bbc.com/news/topics/crjeqkdevwvt/the-uks-european-elections-2019
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Yes, and restore trust in democracy
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Possibly, but at what price?
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No, parliament are too divided
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Yes – but will further divide Parliament
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Yes, and restore trust in democracy

The Brexit Party won European elections by a landslide only six weeks after forming, making the party one of the fastest growing political parties in modern history. The dramatic rise of the Brexit Party was due to the colossal failure of the UK government and Members of Parliament in delivering the decision of 17.4 million Britons who voted to leave the EU in 2016. Dissatisfaction with brexit is not just affecting voters however, with even MPs of the Conservative Party recently threatening to quit and back Farage and the Brexit Party if Boris Johnson cannot deliver some form of brexit by the long extended deadline of October 31st 2019. Support continues for Nigel Farage as he more overtly eyes the position of UK Prime Minister at the next election, a position which may help deliver the brexit that the UK voted for in 2016, restoring faith in the democratic process and in UK politics .

thebrexitparty.org/about dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7146573/Tory-Eurosceptics-warn-QUIT-unless-Boris-Johnson-delivers-Brexit.html express.co.uk/news/uk/1164660/Brexit-news-UK-EU-Nigel-Farage-Boris-Johnson-leave-EU-no-deal-BBC-CPAC-Australia-latest

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 20
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Possibly, but at what price?

This is a massive turning point in UK politics; Farage is a prominent charismatic figure, with significant financial backing (something which has been repeatedly unclear), who has expressed interest in deregulating and privatising the country further, and who has overwhelming won the last EU election held in the UK (albeit a seeming meaningless considering brexit). This leaves the UK in a position where, if the next general election were to follow the last EU elections, many long standing national institutions will be at risk, where social spending may be cut further, emigration may worsen skilled labour shortages, further straining the NHS and lengthening the waiting times in hospitals. Meanwhile economists have argued that a Britain’s exit from the EU on its own may lead to recession, more expensive calling costs, may allow government to roll back climate change legislation, further deregulate banks and allow greater tax evasion systems to develop. The Brexit Party’s popularity may in fact help fuel any type of exit from the EU, they may also have just been a protest vote in a meaningless election, but regardless this party represents a step towards greater social inequality, and pose a real risk to the country's future.

bbc.com/news/world-europe-48417191 theguardian.com/politics/2014/nov/12/film-nigel-farage-insurance-based-nhs-private-companies youtube.com/watch?v=_HDFegpX5gI

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 20
Created

No, parliament are too divided

Farage would command less of a majority than Theresa May or Boris Johnson in Parliament and would therefore struggle to pass anything, one party, especially one led by such a divisive character, could not do a better job of getting a Brexit deal through an even more divided parliament, and the situation would likely just be a further stalemate. The only way this would be possible is if somehow the Brexit party won a general election and won enough seats in parliament to command a majority Government, both of which seem massively unlikely, despite the latest protest vote of the last EU elections. If the country is indeed heading toward a general election Boris Johsnon has already stated that he is adamant not to work with Farage, and likewise a coalition with other centre or left leaning parties is even more likely. Although popular, Nigel Farage is seen as an opportunist by many, and the Brexit Party is likewise viewed as not a real political party as it lacks a manifesto or any cohesive policy.

twitter.com/EFTA4UK/status/1131139537953001472 youtube.com/watch?v=-7hu2LPgFms blogs.spectator.co.uk/2019/05/listen-lib-dem-mep-on-brexit-party-they-are-not-a-real-party

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 14
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Yes – but will further divide Parliament

It looks like opinions are actually more and more fractured in the UK and the country is still harshly divided down the lines of marginal victory of the original Brexit referendum vote. The Brexit Party may be able to engineer a clean cut “no-deal” Brexit, but may not be able to deal with the massive amount of policy changed needed following a harsh split from the EU, especially under such a young party as the 6 month old Brexit Party. Furthermore Nigel Farage will not be able fix the problem of a divided UK Parliament, that is also set to become more fragmented, as bitterness towards the UK’s mainstream political parties is so high following years of indecision and growing numbers are backing more hardliners like Farage.

yahoo.com/news/nigel-farages-brexit-party-lead-eu-election-britain-220628230.html

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Daniel Halliday
May 27
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