Daniel Halliday
Oct 1 · Last update 4 mo. ago.

Who attacked the Aramco oil facility in Saudi Arabia?

2019 has seen a string of attacks that have been blamed on Iran, who continue to deny involvement and have often claimed that the attacks are covert “false flag” operations to generate a pretext for the international community to engage in war with Iran. The latest attacks on the Saudi Aramco oil processing facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais, Saudi Arabia, were one such example, where Yemeni Houthi Rebels claimed responsibility for the attacks but Iran received the blame. However, following the attack many commentators online and in the media are beginning to question the narrative and ask who really did launch this attack? Could this be a false flag pretext for war with Iran? Or is Iran simply trying to cover up their involvement in the incident?
Stats of Viewpoints
A Gulf of Tonkin style False Flag operation
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Iraq
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Iran
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Houthis
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Not clear at this time
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Viewpoints
Add New Viewpoint

A Gulf of Tonkin style False Flag operation

In 1964 incidents in the Gulf of Tolkin off the coast of Vietnam led to US Navy ships initiating attacks on Vietnamese vessels based on false radar imagery. These confrontations where used as a “false-flag”, or as false evidence, by the US government to justify the US entering into the Vietnam War. In the case of the recent Abqaiq–Khurais attacks, missiles and drones were widely reported to have come from the west of the site, Iran being to the east of Saudi Arabia, and despite the Saudi’s maintaining the drones “look” Iranian there is very little hard evidence. Despite the lack of evidence the US quickly accused Iran of being behind the attacks, just as they did Vietnam in the Gulf of Tonkin. Iran maintains that this and a number of attacks blamed on Iran this year, such as the Gulf of Oman Incident, are false-flag attacks being used by the United States as a justification for war with Iran, just like the Gulf of Tonkin Incident was used to start Vietnam.

fair.org/media-beat-column/30-year-anniversary-tonkin-gulf-lie-launched-vietnam-war nytimes.com/interactive/2019/09/16/world/middleeast/trump-saudi-arabia-oil-attack.html bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-49712417 journal-neo.org/2019/09/20/houthi-attack-on-saudi-oil-fields-a-false-flag globalresearch.ca/false-flagging-world-death-gulf-tonkin-incident-gulf-oman/5680833

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Oct 20
Created

Iraq

While the attacks on the Saudi Aramco facilities in Khurais and Abqaiq may have been funded by Iran, the attacks themselves were made from Iraq not Yemen. In mid-September a senior Iraqi intelligence officer came forward to admit both Iranian funding and that the drone strikes being launched from the Hashd al-Shaabi military base in Southern Iraq. The attack, according to the Iraqi official, was to send a message to the US and in revenge for recent Israeli drone attacks launched from Syria to to strike the same Hashd al-Shaabi base in Iraq, attacks that were funded by Saudi Arabia.

middleeasteye.net/news/exclusive-iranian-drones-launched-iraq-carried-out-attacks-saudi-oil-plants

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Oct 20
Created

Iran

Since the attack in September the United States and Saudi Arabia were quick to deny Houthi responsibility claims, placing the blame solely with Iran originally under the logic that the attack, that consisted of a coordinated strike of numerous cruise missiles and around 20 drones, was too sophisticated for Houthi forces. Following these initial claims US intelligence have come forward with evidence that the drones were launched from Iran, while Saudi Arabia found that the drones were similar to Iranian drone technology in there forensic examination of the wreckage. These developments prompted the UK, France and Germany to blame Iran for the attack also, urging Iran to change their course. Regardless of the direct involvement it still stands that Iran are actively backing Houthi rebel forces in the war in Yemen, and for that reason Iran is responsible for the attacks, either directly or indirectly.

abcnews.go.com/International/iran-fired-cruise-missiles-attack-saudi-oil-facility/story?id=65632653 bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-49699429 npr.org/2019/09/18/761985624/saudi-arabia-says-iran-unquestionably-sponsored-attack-on-oil-facilities dw.com/en/germany-france-and-britain-blame-iran-for-saudi-oil-attack/a-50554985

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Oct 19
Created

Houthis

The attacks on the Aramco’s Abdaiq oil processing plant and the Khurais Oil Field were carried out through drones from Yemen and were claimed by Yemen’s Houthi rebel forces. The Houthis staged this attack, and similar drone attacks in recent months in response to Saudi Arabia’s involvement in the War in Yemen since 2015. The Houthis have threatened to widen the scale of such attacks in the future in retaliation for Saudi-led air strikes that have targeted Yemeni civilians.

aljazeera.com/news/2019/09/drones-hit-saudi-aramco-facilities-fires-190914051900472.html

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Oct 13
Created

Not clear at this time

Despite the accusations being thrown around by various governments the evidence that has been released seems inconclusive so far, with the attack and weapons arguably being too sophisticated be Yemeni and being launch from the wrong direction to be directly coming from either Iran or Iraq. For this reason Iran and several media sources have indicated this may be some sort of false flag operation, however this remains more of a conspiracy theory than an evidence based assumption at this time. Regardless, the scale and precision of such a drone swarm attack, one which was able to overcome the advanced American defence systems used at the Aramco site, may represent the beginning of a new era in low cost weapons systems that could potentially overwhelm highly defended targets, leaving water supplies, and oil pipelines looking increasingly vulnerable in the future.

nytimes.com/interactive/2019/09/16/world/middleeast/trump-saudi-arabia-oil-attack.html theguardian.com/world/2019/sep/19/how-did-attack-breach-saudi-defences-and-what-will-happen-next defensenews.com/global/mideast-africa/2019/09/26/are-air-defense-systems-ready-to-confront-drone-swarms

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Oct 1
Created
Translate