Daniel Halliday
Mar 23 · Last update 6 mo. ago.

What should happen to the refugees after the fall of ISIS?

Despite Donald Trump announcing the complete defeat of ISIS numerous times fighting has continued, but in recent weeks refugees have flooded out of the last Islamic State town of Baghuz. In this latest, seemingly final, siege against the Islamic State caliphate 60,000 people have fled fighting in this last stronghold, most of them women and children. Considering their link to extremism, what can be done about the situation of ISIS refugees and what should be done about the multitude of international migrants who have supported ISIS and will now wish to return home? youtube.com/watch?v=twi1NYnVHu8
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Fighters have already fled, there is no solution
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Fighting the corruption and lack of religious tolerance that bred such groups in the first place
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Facilitate refugees in leaving the region and deradicalise them
1 agrees
0 disagrees
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Fighters have already fled, there is no solution

Nothing can be done to safely dismantle ISIS, there are too many refugees and the ideology is largely spread across the world already, from Nigeria to the Philippines. As many refugees as possible need to all be taken as Prisoners of War and stand trial or be supervised closely, the same level of funding that went into fighting Islamic state now needs to be put into schemes to process these people, and provide counselling to returning children that may have witnessed unthinkable crimes. But overall the numbers and chaotic nature of the situation in Iraq and Syria means that these people will ultimately migrate to different regions, making this increasingly a global problem, the world runs a risk of this situation and related problems continuing.

yahoo.com/lifestyle/islamic-states-caliphate-wiped-heres-isis-remain-huge-threat-084430363.html?guccounter=1 edition.cnn.com/2019/06/24/australia/syria-isis-australia-intl-hnk/index.html?ref=hvper.com

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Daniel Halliday
Jun 25
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Fighting the corruption and lack of religious tolerance that bred such groups in the first place

ISIS is made up of fighters who rightly or wrong have been indoctrinated into viewing the situation of their country as a situation of religious persecution. Even though their caliphate has now fallen, and they have now been made refugees, these people will continue to feel this religious persecution and will go on fighting or feeling prepared to until they are un-indoctrinated somehow, or the dismal situation of religious intolerance is addressed. Refugees should be confined to their geographical location as much as possible, to not let memories of the Islamic state caliphate spread and develop in any way. But ultimately establishing peace and religious tolerance in the regions affected by this violence and unrest will have to be the long term goal, those from other regions should be permitted to return their country of origin to stand trial or allowed to stay.

vox.com/2018/11/20/17995846/the-conflict-between-iraqi-sunnis-and-shias-sustains-isis

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Daniel Halliday
May 8
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Facilitate refugees in leaving the region and deradicalise them

The fight against this form of religious extremism hasn’t ended with the fall of “Islamic State” and will continue to be one of ideology that is pushed underground. However if ISIS refugees were facilitated in leaving their location the problem would be removed and the ideology would effectively be split apart and refugees could be deradicalised elsewhere. Likewise, if all countries unilaterally step up their humanitarian efforts to try and integrate extremists and show them religious tolerance can exist, deradicalisation may be sped up for some and the ideology may phased out through togetherness. yahoo.com/lifestyle/islamic-states-caliphate-wiped-heres-isis-remain-huge-threat-084430363.html

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Daniel Halliday
Mar 23
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