Daniel Halliday
Mar 11 · Last update 6 mo. ago.

Is there a solution for the Tibetan independence movement?

Today, on the 60th anniversary of the 1959 Tibetan Rebellion and the fleeing of the Dalai Lama and Tibet’s government to India, the situation between China, the Dalai Lama and the Central Tibetan Administration (Tibet’s government in exile) remains at an impasse. However the Tibetan Diaspora continue to protest and demand independence, while China remain steadfast in their policies in Tibet. What do you think is the best solution to this situation, if there can be one? stltoday.com/news/world/years-after-dalai-lama-fled-china-defends-tibet-policies/article_54db8d8e-db8f-5249-8d64-d0bd8bb1405b.html
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No solution but positive impact despite occupation
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Yes, through greater multilateral pressure on China
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No, but mutual respect will at least make this a more peaceful deadlock
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No solution but positive impact despite occupation

The issue of territorial rights over the Tibetan plateau has no solution short of a change of Chinese government, as they have made their view overwhelmingly clear that they are unwilling even discuss their sovereignty over this region, and Xi Jinping’s government seem increasingly more secure. However the issue isn’t so morally clear cut, as under Chinese rule the people of Tibet have experienced a sharp improvement in their quality of life. With per capita income, national GDP, and various human rights being improved under Chinese rule compared to that of the Dalai Lama, Tibetans are better off under Chinese modernisation.

theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1999/02/tibet-through-chinese-eyes/306395

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Daniel Halliday
May 30
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Yes, through greater multilateral pressure on China

Following Donald Trump's proposed cut to funding for the US support for Tibetan independence and the inevitable and eventual death of the Dalai Lama, the movement runs the risk of falling into obscurity. Violence, torture, and religious, cultural and political repression have all become norms in China’s, so-called, Tibet Autonomous Region, as China desires to control the region for its geopolitical significance, mainly due to Tibet’s enormous water riches. For the sake of human rights and to curb China’s efforts to dominate the region, more should be done to help and not forget the Tibetan independence movement; more pressure should be put on China multilaterally from organisations such as the UN and countries friendly to this important political movement.

bathtubbulletin.com/why-the-dalai-lamas-reincarnation-is-up-for-debate dailysignal.com/2017/06/02/china-abusing-human-rights-tibet-heres-us-can-help theglobalist.com/tibet-and-21st-century-water-wars

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 24
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No, but mutual respect will at least make this a more peaceful deadlock

The situation in Tibet has been such a long stalemate that even the Dalai Lama has publicly given up on the push for independence or greater autonomy in Tibet. China however continues to accuse the Dalai Lama of leading the Tibetan independence movement and refuse to enter into a dialogue. If China is serious about the freedom of religion provided for in their constitution the Chinese government should meet with the Dalai Lama, at least to demonstrate respect to his position and importance to Tibetan Buddhists. Likewise as it seems the Dalai Lama has already accepted the situation, the Tibetan independence movement should recognise the futility of their position with China and push for mutual respect and greater acknowledgement of human rights in the region. theguardian.com/world/2008/oct/26/tibet-dalailama en.people.cn/constitution/constitution.html

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Daniel Halliday
Mar 11
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