Daniel Halliday
Jul 9 · Last update 14 days ago.

What can be done about the devastating droughts in Chile?

Chile has a long history of severe droughts, but this most recent drought, now in its tenth year, has caused worries of this becoming a permanent reality. The drought is decimating the Chilean countryside, has completely died up the Aculeo Lagoon, and a study carried out by the University of Chile has warned that the country’s capital Santiago may even have problems providing drinking water in the next decade if trends continue. What can be done about the droughts in Chile? aljazeera.com/news/2019/07/chile-suffers-worst-drought-60-years-190708191849467.html
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Government need to take control or face instability
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Invest
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Nothing… alone
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New technology
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Reform
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Government need to take control or face instability

The droughts are just one serious symptom of the bigger problem of climate change, and the mishandling of it by Chile’s inept government is causing serious social upheaval; the government need to take better control of this situation or will face more problems moving forward. Chileans are currently protesting fuel rate hikes, but these hikes are themselves the result of the Chilean government's aggressive environmental policies. The government cannot expect to put the financial burden of climate change on the poorest of people with such high levels of inequality in the country. The burden needs to be on the companies that produce the most emissions and extra taxation needs to fund renewable energy innovation directly. The droughts in Chile will not go away, but if climate change is used by the government to worsen inequality instability will prove more damaging than drought, the droughts and the protest should send a powerful message to Chile's leaders.

americanthinker.com/blog/2019/11/chile_and_the_revolt_against_climatechange_policies.html inthesetimes.com/article/22213/youth-activist-chile-climate-repression-united-nations-protests oecd.org/env/resources/49012553.pdf dialogochino.net/30820-chiles-mega-drought-rolls-on

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Daniel Halliday
Jan 14
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Invest

The government of Chile has lined up a number of infrastructure investment plans to fight the drought crisis in the country, billions of dollars will be needed to address the huge scale of drought in the country. Despite Chile’s water management being largely privatised under the 1981 Water Code, the government is planning to invest $462 million in rural water systems by 2022, and are planning to build a $6 billion water reservoir system to better secure drinking water. Similar hot, dry and drought stricken regions such as Australia are similarly attempting to invest their way to water security, and as precipitation forecasts indicate such weather patterns will probably worsen by 40-50% until at least 2059, investment is probably the only solution to this mounting issue.

bnamericas.com/en/news/water-utilities-to-invest-us700mn-to-face-chile-drought reuters.com/article/us-australia-drought-investment-idUSKBN1WS01Y reuters.com/article/us-chile-drought-idUSKBN0MK2HJ20150324 oecd.org/env/resources/49012553.pdf

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Daniel Halliday
Jan 14
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Nothing… alone

More than any other weather pattern or environmental crisis, scientists and commentators seem convinced that climate change is the main driver behind the pattern of worsening droughts in Chile. Climate change is an all-encompassing threat than can only be addressed multilaterally; all the world’s nations need to act together to address this monumental issue. Water infrastructure and quality is thought to be good in Chile, with Chile’s National Commission of the Environment setting a goal of 95% reuse of wastewater in 2010, although further improvements to infrastructure may ease drought somewhat, the foundation of the problem remains a changing climate. In this way life and weather in Chile may have changed forever, but preventing it from worsening is a bigger task in the hands of all of the worlds leaders, so nothing can be done by Chile alone.

climaterealityproject.org/blog/facts-about-climate-change-and-drought researchgate.net/publication/300376358_Integrated_water_management_in_Chile npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/07/16/536896748/in-chile-many-regard-climate-change-as-the-greatest-external-threat freshplaza.com/article/9151038/chile-s-unprecedented-drought-affects-37-000-farmers

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Daniel Halliday
Jan 14
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New technology

Following a recent trend of extreme weather conditions globally, companies, governments and farms alike are looking to new and existing technology to tackle devastating climate issues such as drought. For countries like Chile, currently gripped by bitter protests such schemes may require multinational involvement, but some countries are already dependent on such technologies, for example Singapore’s use of desalinisation technology used to provide drinking water, such solutions could also help Chile in the short term. But it is newer technologies that seem most promising, droughts in California have more and more farmers looking toward drip irrigation and moisture monitoring systems for smart water management to aid water conservation and efficiency. A combination of such methods, while possibly not addressing the loss of habitats such as the Aculeo Lagoon, could really help provide better food and livelihood security for countless Chileans.

forbes.com/sites/mikemontgomery/2019/08/14/hope-springs-eternal-the-new-wave-of-startups-fighting-drought/#5f11f0805fea droughtresilience.com/technologies agalert.com/story/?id=7179 desalination.biz/news/0/Singapore-to-tender-S5-billion-of-water-and-waste-works/9066

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Daniel Halliday
Oct 25
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Reform

A large contributor to the drought conditions in Chile is the aggressive unsustainable fruit agriculture industry that feeds current global food trends while, sometimes illegally, stealing water from other farms. Avocados for example require a massive 1,280 litres of water per kilogram of fruit, growing such a thirsty crop has caused many to dig deeper wells causing a fall in the water table for the region, putting smaller businesses growing more sustainable crops out of business. Avocados have become so lucrative it is the avocado businesses that are able to afford the expenses needed to divert water to their farms and many have been accused of breaking the law to do so, addressing this issue will require both agricultural and water supply reform in Chile.

vogue.co.uk/article/the-real-cost-of-avocados-facts-and-health-economy thecanary.co/discovery/analysis-discovery/2018/06/11/the-uks-obsession-with-avocados-is-helping-to-destroy-communities-on-the-other-side-of-the-world

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Daniel Halliday
Jul 9
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