Daniel Halliday
Feb 7 · Last update 1 mo. ago.
Should the United States hold war referendums?
In the 1930’s US Congressman Louis Ludlow proposed an amendment to the US constitution calling for a national referendum before any declaration of war could be made, excluding cases of national defence. With so many failed wars, or wars complicated by ill planned US interventionism or support, should the United States' overseas military operations have to be decided by referendum? Could war referendums similar to the proposed Ludlow Amendment bring peace to the world?
Stats of Viewpoints
No, a complicated waste of time
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Breaking down the industrial military complex
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Viewpoints
Add New Viewpoint
No, a complicated waste of time

Holding a referendum over whether or not to go to war in a time of humanitarian disaster, or an already ongoing war or invasion, would be constitute a massive over complication, wasting precious time, and possibly jeopardising human lives as a consequence. With recent referendums such as Brexit in mind, it is clear that war referendums would just be setting impossible hurdles in what is already an extremely difficult matter of intervening in cases of humanitarian suffering or the breaking of international law. Another clear example is a quote from Michigan Senator Arthur Vandenberg who became an interventionist following the Second World War, famously saying the Ludlow amendment "would be as sensible [as] to require a town meeting before permitting the fire department to face a blaze" [1] [1] cfr.org/blog/twe-remembers-ludlow-amendment

Agree
Disagree
Breaking down the industrial military complex

A procedure to seek public approval for war efforts could help break the cycle of permanent military conflicts the United States seems to involve itself in, where war has arguably become more of a money making industry, rather than a reluctant last resort. This would mostly like minimise the chances of the US going to war, and force politicians to seek more diplomatic solutions to intentional relations. Referendums would also make the diplomatic process more direct, as arguably elected representatives too often have conflicting interests, with the amount of lobbying and paid private events politicians often attend at the request of corporate and foreign interests.

Agree
Disagree
Translate