Daniel Halliday
Apr 12 · Last update 3 mo. ago.
Should crimes committed online be prosecuted internationally?
A British woman has recently been arrested in Dubai following a Facebook comment she posted in the UK referring to her ex-husbands wife as a “horse”. The post in question apparently violates Dubai’s strict anti-defamation laws and the women faces up to a two year jail sentence or a $65,000 USD fine. Although on the surface this seems a fairly ridiculous case, in reality there are many seemingly unrelated issues that occupy in a nuanced legal area of international cyber-crime. Is Dubai right to prosecute someone for a Facebook post, posted abroad? Should crimes committed online be tried in the country they were committed in or internationally? bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47847740
Stats of Viewpoints
No, laws are regional and cannot by exported to other countries
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Yes, a country should uphold their laws
0 agrees
0 disagrees
The need for new international law for cyber crimes
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Not for such minor crimes
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Viewpoints
Add New Viewpoint
No, laws are regional and cannot by exported to other countries

Laws should be enforced, and crimes prosecuted against, only in the regions in which they are committed. The Dubai authorities should have deported the woman and required British law enforcement to deal with her, this was not a crime when and where the act was being committed, and it should not be prosecuted as one. It is analogous to prosecuting a crime retrospectively for infringements of crimes that are not yet crimes, another grey area that would be unjust and lead to needless prosecution. Attempting to prosecute all legal infringements internationally would run into many issues breaking laws people are unaware of globally or that wouldn’t be a crime regionally, it is ridiculous and makes no sense as potentially every tourist entering Dubai could be accused of similar crimes.

businessinsider.co.za/laleh-shahravesh-brit-faces-dubai-jail-for-calling-exs-wife-horse-2019-4

Agree
Disagree
Yes, a country should uphold their laws

Just because the crime was committed remotely doesn’t detract from the fact that the criminal targeted and carried out the act with intention to cause harm, any country is right to enforce their own laws, both on their own citizens and on foreign nationals. In the case of the British woman arrested in Dubai the crime was committed remotely but it is a similar to defamation committed in the country, and arguably it would have reached more people in fact being online making it almost worse. In addition the woman was formerly married to a man in this region so would have been somewhat aware of regional laws, and her behaviour was initially reported due to longstanding online harassment, making this a clear attempt to cause harm, an infringement of the law and not a issue of her ignorance. If similar crimes had led to hacking or stealing money, there would not have been such a media backlash against this case and people would be more inclined to favour prosecution, Dubai is right to uphold their laws in this way.

irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/world/let-the-law-take-part--woman-branded-horse-by-uk-woman-on-facebook-glad-she-faces-jail-in-dubai-916138.html

Agree
Disagree
The need for new international law for cyber crimes

The internet is almost a separate space that operates alongside the real world, should there not be different laws applied, and should that not have to be ubiquitous for all users of the internet? Forming an overriding set of international laws to govern the internet could help to deal with the problems of hacking other countries and defamation cases such as the Saudi case. But they could also help resolve cases of whistleblowing (the Snowden, Assange, and Manning cases) that have led to torture, or an escape of it, and the breaking of international human rights. The current situation of certain countries harbouring other countries “criminals” for political reasons needs to end but at the same time international law needs to be upheld. The world needs a set of guidelines to make obvious what does and does not constitute crime online, as multiple cases have demonstrated that a world on the internet is filled with legal nuances.

youtube.com/watch?v=Yu8KQ7ceN9w

Agree
Disagree
Not for such minor crimes

This particular example represents an overzealous application of law involving what is, or in this case isn’t, cyber-crime in some countries. Some countries still need to work on the legalities of the use of new technologies, and questions such as what constitutes a crime worth pursuing foreign nationals for. Under strictly authoritarian regimes this issue seems particularly in need of reviewing in some way, especially considering the similar recent case involving the fining and deportation of a jealous wife who checked her husband’s phone in the United Arab Emirates (link below).

bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-36320749

Agree
Disagree
Translate