Daniel Halliday
Jul 19 · Last update 1 mo. ago.
Has the international response made the War in Darfur worse?
Are the UN, the ICC and the sanctions imposed by the US having any positive effect in Sudan?
Stats of Viewpoints
This is too complicated a peacekeeping mission for international parties to effectively intervene
0 agrees
0 disagrees
China’s support of the Sudanese government has reduced the UN’s efficacy
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Yes, inaction coupled with sanctions have just exacerbated the situation
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Viewpoints
Add New Viewpoint
This is too complicated a peacekeeping mission for international parties to effectively intervene

Originally the African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS) was set up in an attempt to keep peace in the Darfur region. However, these forces were too small and the violence in the region couldn’t be contained. In 2005 the UN proposed sending a 20,000 strong peacekeeping force to merge with AU forces as part of UNAMID (United Nation-African Union Mission in Darfur). The Sudanese president al-Bashir then refused international support in Sudan, claiming “we don’t want Sudan to turn into another Iraq”. It wasn’t until AMIS was on the point of collapse in 2007 that the UN were finally allowed to enter Darfur, allowing the situation to become much worse.

The conflict in Sudan has been complex in both the number of sides, ethnicities and tribes involved in the fighting, but also the number of reasons for each side fighting. Although the war official began following rebel groups fighting the government over accusations over the oppression of non-Arabs in Darfur, there have been many issues such as land disputes between nomads and farmers, water access, and religious, ethnic and social differences that have been seen to have contributed. What has made this situation so much more complicated then is the apartheid like system of Ethnic separation that is so ingrained and difficult to control.

Furthermore following allegations of genocide and war crimes made against the government, the reception of international aid has become increasingly questioned by the government. This has complicated international support of the government and rebels, the humanitarian crisis and any possibility of peacekeeping or the end of violence. What is the right thing to do if international help is unwanted? With feet on the ground and aid repeatedly offered and denied, what other choice do international parties have than to impose sanctions on uncooperative state leaders?

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Nov 4
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
Furthermore following allegations of genocide and war crimes made against the government, the reception of international aid has become increasingly questioned by the government. This has complicated international support of the government and rebels, the humanitarian crisis and any possibility of peacekeeping or the end of violence. What is the right thing to do if international help is unwanted? With feet on the ground and aid repeatedly offered and denied, what other choice do international parties have than to impose sanctions on uncooperative state leaders?
China’s support of the Sudanese government has reduced the UN’s efficacy

Despite a UN arms embargo placed on the Sudanese government, China has continued to supply weapons to the region. China has sold $55 million USD worth of weapons to the Sudanese government since that start of the conflict in Darfur, in return for oil. China has also threatened to veto decisions made by the UN regarding Sudan, and abstained from voting on UN resolutions concerning Sudan.

To deal with a problem swiftly and effectively the international community need to be on the same page about the resolution to a problem. As we can see in this example one party’s ill intention can derail the whole peace process. Countries that have repeatedly put business ventures in the path of achieving greater peace and stability in the world should have their membership of organisations such as the UN reconsidered.

China has outwardly expressed their seriousness at helping the peace process in Sudan, and denied supplying weapons here even though they remain the biggest weapons exporters to Sub-Saharan Africa, and the third largest arms exporter in the world. As the boarders of Sudan remain permeable, to claim weapons are not entering Sudan, regardless of where they are sold, is massively short sighted. In 2015 a UN report went as far as naming a Chinese company, Norinco, as alone being responsible for selling $20 million worth of arms, ammunition, and explosives in 2014.

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Nov 4
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
China has outwardly expressed their seriousness at helping the peace process in Sudan, and denied supplying weapons here even though they remain the biggest weapons exporters to Sub-Saharan Africa, and the third largest arms exporter in the world. As the boarders of Sudan remain permeable, to claim weapons are not entering Sudan, regardless of where they are sold, is massively short sighted. In 2015 a UN report went as far as naming a Chinese company, Norinco, as alone being responsible for selling $20 million worth of arms, ammunition, and explosives in 2014.
Yes, inaction coupled with sanctions have just exacerbated the situation

The US and UN imposed sanctions and an arms embargo on the Sudanese government following accusations of genocide and ethnic cleansing in Darfur. Neither of these have worked, and as the International Criminal Court issued arrest warrants for members of government and militant groups, the Sudanese Government denied the ICC had jurisdiction over the matter and expelled 13 aid organisers in a backlash. This has only caused the conditions in refugee camps to worsen and harmed the peace process.

As UN sponsored refugee camps across Africa fall into states of chaos, the UN needs to rethink its handling of war zones and refugee camps. In refugee camps in countries such as Sudan, Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo malaria and HIV are reaching epidemic proportions, sanitation is sometimes non-existent and UN peacekeepers are being accused of a wide array of sexual abuse crimes. These are all indicators of a systematic failure of the UN's feet-on-the-ground policy in these regions, and this is in drastic need of reform.

In 2007 the International Criminal Court issued arrest warrants for former Sudanese Minister of State for the Interior Ahmed Haroun, and Janjaweed Militia leader Ali Kushayb. The following year president Omar al-Bashir had charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and murder filed against him. This caused him to denounced the authority of the ICC and withdraw Sudan's signature of the Rome Statute, the ICC treaty establishing genocide and war crime law. These charges have been criticised by the Arab League and the African Union, and as Sudan signed but never ratified the Rome Statute, the ICC remained effectively powerless in bringing him to justice. Analysts have described the ICC’s actions as damaging to the peace process, as they have effectively chosen a side in the war by criminalising only one side.

Agree
Disagree
Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Nov 4
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
As UN sponsored refugee camps across Africa fall into states of chaos, the UN needs to rethink its handling of war zones and refugee camps. In refugee camps in countries such as Sudan, Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo malaria and HIV are reaching epidemic proportions, sanitation is sometimes non-existent and UN peacekeepers are being accused of a wide array of sexual abuse crimes. These are all indicators of a systematic failure of the UN's feet-on-the-ground policy in these regions, and this is in drastic need of reform.
Translate