Daniel Halliday
Apr 8 · Last update 2 mo. ago.

Do we need more laws to protect whistleblowers?

Whistleblowers face an often harsh level of retribution for bringing to light cases of fraud, malpractice or corruption, facing job dismissal, criminal charges, or sometimes threats to their safety. However whistleblowers often take great risks, making bold ethical decisions in the interests of the general public. Do we need to rethink our attitudes toward whistleblowers and offer them greater protection?
Stats of Viewpoints
More discussion is needed, to legislate conduct standards
0 agrees
0 disagrees
No – People need to appreciate the threats posed
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Yes, there is a definite need to international protections
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Yes – they can be targets of retribution
1 agrees
0 disagrees
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More discussion is needed, to legislate conduct standards

There needs to be greater dialogue around the nuance of transparency/corruption vs law/national security, as in the current environment neither side of the argument is being properly protected. Should a government body be entitled to interpret a country’s laws, especially when laws may be open to some interpretation and have been written hundreds of years before the advent of the internet for example? Should a government’s crimes be bought to public attention even if it means the country’s military operations, forces or national security may be put at risk? These are highly nuanced areas that need further public debate and more clear legislative standards that set a legal precedent, rather than ad hoc measures that seem to depend on the situation and that people largely disagree on.

economist.com/democracy-in-america/2014/01/10/a-case-for-clemency-for-snowden

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Daniel Halliday
Jul 13
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No – People need to appreciate the threats posed

Laws to protect whistle-blowers are largely in place internationally and the push to adopt such legislation is becoming ever stronger with countries like Ghana, South Korea, Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda and Nigeria recently adopting legislation to protect the practice. So arguably there are enough laws in place already to protect reasonable whistle-blowing practices, but what really needs addressing is they blanket assumption that all whistle-blowing is a positive by default, people of the information age still need to realise they can put their country it danger. The risks posed by whistle-blowers such as Edward Snowden for example far outweigh any benefit his leaks may have exposed, as not only American security but intelligence and diplomacy were also badly damaged by his actions.

economist.com/democracy-in-america/2014/01/10/treachery-and-its-consequences

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Daniel Halliday
Jul 13
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Yes, there is a definite need to international protections

In this current international political more modern protection options for whistle-blowers in addition to greater legal and physical protection are needed, especially for crimes committed remotely or through the Internet as this represents a massive legal grey area. In a digital world where many people are being pursued for crimes committed online we need better protections for international human rights and the first place this should extend is to whistle-blowers. Whistle-blowers are people that put their reputation, career and sometimes safety on the line to tackle corruption, these people should be protected internationally at all costs.

whistleblower.org/international-whistleblower-rights newsweek.com/dubai-prison-british-woman-mother-horse-ex-husband-wife-cybercrime-defamation-1388658

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Daniel Halliday
May 14
Created

Yes – they can be targets of retribution

Whistleblowers and those who speak out in the public interest are under immense psychological stress and sometimes in physical danger; despite this few countries have comprehensive laws protecting whistleblowers. The laws of many states that do have a legal framework for protecting whistleblowers remain a patchwork of different policies, for example in the US. In the US important laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act that offer some legal protection to whistleblowers are now being attacked also, with figures such as Donald Trump advocating a roll back of such laws. More needs to be done to protect these laws and more laws need to be passed to protect whistleblowing.

whistleblowergov.org/financial-and-banks.php?article=trump-administrations-rollback-of-bank-regulations-under-dodd-frank-moves-forward_134#navbar questia.com/magazine/1P3-2914813151/enhanced-protections-for-whistleblowers-under-the

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 9
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