Daniel Halliday
Jun 2 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

Oklahoma vs Johnson & Johnson, could this case help beat the Opioid Epidemic?

The US has suffered for years with an Opioid Crisis, a problem of long term wide spread opiate addiction caused by the over prescription of opiate containing medication dating back to the 1990’s. Flooding the market with strong opiates caused abundance that has fuelled addiction, and has led to huge numbers of people moving on to other similar street drugs when they can no longer obtain or afford the prescription medication they have become dependent on. In a possibly precedent-setting case Oklahoma State have filed litigation against the pharmaceuticals giant Johnson & Johnson for their role in the state’s Opioid Epidemic. What effect could this case have on this massive social issue in the United States and internationally?
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A step in the right direction but the underlying cause needs addressing
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Yes and could have knock-on effects abroad...
0 agrees
0 disagrees
No, the FDA should regulate this better
0 agrees
0 disagrees
No, over-prescription is not the manufacturers fault
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Yes, their accountability will help ease the crisis
1 agrees
0 disagrees
No, this is not prosecutable
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0 disagrees
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A step in the right direction but the underlying cause needs addressing

Tackling the over supply of opioid medication is just one side of the opioid epidemic, the nature of a traumatised society that can have such high levels of drug addiction also need to be addressed in some way though if this crisis is truly going to be recovered from. The root of addiction is trauma; addressing trauma is the only way to address this issue properly and drug manufactures do not just need to pay damages but should be funding holistic rehabilitation, psychotherapy and counselling programs if this crisis is really going to be overcome. If this leads to further legislation, and opiates are further criminalised, this outcome will leave some in pain and many directing their addictive behaviours elsewhere, addiction is just a symptom of a traumatic childhood and its cause needs to be addressed not medicated or suppressed.

evergreendrugrehab.com/blog/trauma-addiction-connected ashwoodrecovery.com/blog/the-connection-between-trauma-and-addiction youtube.com/watch?v=7IxULjyXy-Q

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Daniel Halliday
Dec 23
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Yes and could have knock-on effects abroad...

The landmark case of Oklahoma vs Johnson & Johnson ended with an Oklahoma judge finding that the company were guilty of misleading marketing and their promotion of opiates compromised the safety of citizens in Oklahoma, ruling that Johnson & Johnson pay $572 million USD. This could go some way to battle the opioid epidemic by holding one of the company’s responsible accountable for the part they have played in this crisis, and using this fine to help treat those effected. But the ripples of this case will spread far and wide as not only are 40 states also currently pursuing similar claims against drug manufacturers and distributors but the federal government are also. Likewise countries like the UK & Canada are also suffering effects of similar crises, while countries like Nigeria are being horribly under subscribed these medications, getting 0.2% of the their requirement of opiate drugs in the medical industry. Displaying the real intention of these companies, maximising profits by over supplying those who can afford higher prices.

democracynow.org/2019/8/27/oklahoma_johnson_and_johnson_572_million theguardian.com/us-news/ng-interactive/2019/aug/26/johnson-johnson-opioid-ruling-explained-the-key-points web.archive.org/web/20091201034539/http://www.euro.who.int/document/e76503.pdf oklahoman.com/article/5627055/settlement-ends-oklahoma-lawsuit-against-johnson-johnson

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Daniel Halliday
Dec 23
Created

No, the FDA should regulate this better

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should have stepped in and changed the legality of OxyContin earlier if there really was the intent to cause harm by drug manufacturers such as Johnson & Johnson. The US should be able to rely on the federal legislative body to do its job, and the level of the opioid crisis suggests a failure on the part of the FDA or that the federal government itself are at fault, not drug manufactures. In fact according to Ed Thompson, a high-ranking executive from the pharmaceutical industry, the FDA is wholly to blame, allowing pharmaceutical companies to advertise heavily and sell more pills at higher doses as the FDA set opioid medication as a "daily, around-the-clock, long-term… treatment" for pain in the first place [1].

ppahs.org/2018/01/what-is-and-isnt-being-done-to-stop-the-opioid-epidemic [1] cbsnews.com/news/opioid-epidemic-did-the-fda-ignite-the-crisis-60-minutes khn.org/morning-breakout/viewpoints-the-fda-isnt-up-to-the-task-of-reining-in-the-opioid-epidemic-the-downside-of-taking-children-from-parents-in-drug-treatment

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Daniel Halliday
Dec 23
Created

No, over-prescription is not the manufacturers fault

Opioids are an essential and useful drug; they have just been over prescribed which is not the manufacturers fault. Painkillers are an indispensable part of modern medicine, and opioid drugs serve a medical purpose, for pain management there is nothing as effective, and these drugs will remain a part of society. There is a long history of use of opiate drugs in the world, and their production is not the source of their misuse, they play an important role in society, and greater regulation is the answer to preventing epidemics, not blaming the manufacturer or banning the use of opiates.

cnbc.com/video/2019/05/28/oklahoma-accuses-johnson-johnson-of-fueling-the-opioid-epidemic.html

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Daniel Halliday
Dec 23
Created

Yes, their accountability will help ease the crisis

Johnson and Johnson (J&J) are guilty of greatly exacerbating this problem, deceptively marketing drugs that are too strong and highly addictive. Furthermore J&J, and indeed any other pharmaceutical producer, medical organisation or government campaign, have not made enough effort in the last 20 years to provide clear information on downsides of opioids, meaning cases like this are becoming more common, with around 2000 opioid supply related lawsuits still pending in the United States. Other companies have already paid damages, and in the case of the above mentioned Oklahoma v Johnson lawsuit, J&J were ordered to pay $572 million in late August 2019. This case looks like a sign of what is to come for pharmaceutical manufacturers, and likewise a sign this case could make a significant dent in the Opioid addiction crisis in the US.

aljazeera.com/news/2019/05/opioid-crisis-oklahoma-takes-johnson-johnson-court-190528091839220.html theguardian.com/us-news/2019/may/28/johnson-johnson-opioid-trial-oklahoma businessinsider.com/oklahoma-judge-orders-jnj-pay-572-million-role-opioid-epidemic-2019-8

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 30
Created

No, this is not prosecutable

This case will fall apart under the scrutiny of a judge, Johnson & Johnson have nothing to gain from generating these massive social problems and actively killing their customers, their model is to have their customers stay alive and needing medication, to be customers for longer and maximise profits. Johnson & Johnson have acted responsibly by just providing FDA-approved pain medication operating well within the law. The company earn only 46% of its revenue from all the pharmaceuticals they sell, making one particular medicine a small percentage of total profit, so to depict the company as purposefully profiteering from an opioid crisis is misleading. The only effect this will have in the US or internationally is to damage Johnson & Johnson’s reputation.

fool.com/investing/2017/08/23/how-johnson-johnson-makes-most-of-its-money.aspx

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Daniel Halliday
Jun 3
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