Daniel Halliday
Jun 3 · Last update 2 mo. ago.

Same sex marriage, a human right for all or a tradition that shouldn’t be changed?

Taiwan has recently become the first country in Asia to legalise gay marriage. Is this a sign of changing global attitudes that could continue or is this unlikely to go any further in this often traditionalist/religiously conservative part of the world? Should marriage be a human right for all or a reserved tradition for heterosexual couples only?
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Marriage rights for all couples
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Tradition should not be abandoned
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Equal human rights for all
1 agrees
0 disagrees
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Marriage rights for all couples

Marriage is becoming an obsolete institution that suits less and less lifestyles in the modern world, and the fact that marriage carries with it tax, social security, legal and inheritance benefits is unfair to cohabiting couples of all orientations that deserve the same rights as married couples. More and more people are realising marriage can lead to unhappiness and strain a relationship, while dating and relationship dynamics are also changing for the better, with less societal expectation and more freedom. There is less of a need for marriage now and marriage is becoming less of an institution, moving forward more should be done to give greater rights to cohabiting couples without the need to get married.

refinery29.com/en-gb/2019/01/222396/unmarried-couples-rights harpersbazaar.com/culture/politics/a12787881/decline-of-marrige-wall-street-journal-response theknot.com/content/benefits-of-marriage

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Daniel Halliday
Jan 26
Created

Tradition should not be abandoned

This issue remains divisive but is being pushed by those in power to try and form an image of being forward thinking or liberal, and in the case of Taiwan it may be just the case of demonstrating their political divide from the mainland rather than an actual will of the people of the country. In addition there are many countries where public outrage would be the only outcome of trying to impose such a law on what is essentially, and what is still the case in many parts of the world, a religious or community matter and nothing to do with state. Each state has a rich set of cultures and traditions, which need to be respected, and a region of people are against something that is seen as moral in other countries their way of life and rule of law should still be respected. However there is a palpable push for an escalation of this issue by the UN and some multinational organisations that seem intent on ignoring this aspect of the debate, it would be wise to consider the outcome of legalising same-sex marriage in religiously or culturally conservative countries, as there is already too much violence and support for extremism in the world.

bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-05-25/taiwan-gay-marriage-ruling-widens-political-divide-with-china thepublicdiscourse.com/2016/01/16281

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Daniel Halliday
Sep 5
Created

Equal human rights for all

Same sex relationships are widely recognised as a human right, so these couples should have the same rights as heterosexual couples and have their relationship recognised legally. Same sex relationships are near ubiquitous, appearing in all societies and even in nature amongst most species, it is only natural to recognise and accept that, and human traditions should be inclusive of all people, regardless of who their partner is. Currently Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, South Africa, Spain and Sweden have all legalised same sex marriage, while many others have legalised civil partnerships, and even the United Nations supports this basic area of what should be a universal human right.

undispatch.com/map-of-the-day-where-same-sex-marriage-is-legal

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Daniel Halliday
Jun 4
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