Daniel Halliday
May 28 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

Who were the Japanese Red Army and why did their revolution fail?

Despite being the preliminary model for East Asian capitalism, by the late 60's early 70's Japan saw a minor student movement aimed at overthrowing the government and Emperor to establish a communist revolution in the country. By 1969 the ‘Red Army Faction’ had declared war on the state, and by 1971 had divided and given rise to several splinter groups such as the United Red Army and Japanese Red Army, but their revolution was derailed just a year later and the group was declared completely disbanded in 2001. What is the legacy of Japan’s short-lived communist revolutionary army? And why did the Japanese Red Army’s revolution fail?
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A group of psychopaths – paranoia and the famous purge
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A group of psychopaths – paranoia and the famous purge

By February 1972, just a few years after declaring war on the state of Japan, paranoia and distrust were leading leftist student revolutionary groups in Japan to splinter and become increasingly violent. This period was most famously marked by a bloody purge in which the United Red Army’s (URA) leadership ordered 8 members to be beaten to death while leaving 6 more outside to freeze to death. In the chaos that followed the arrest of the URA, five members fled, took a hostage and barricaded themselves in a guesthouse in a nearby town. What followed was ten-day standoff between these URA members and police that came to be known as the Asama-Sansō incident. This incident generated an intense backlash in Japanese society, with radical leftist groups losing significant support in the coming years, effectively destroying the leftist movement in Japan, in this way the Japanese leftist revolution was over before it had even began.

medium.com/discourse/last-stand-the-hostage-crisis-that-ended-japans-red-army-7ae9419fe800 serialkillercalendar.com/Hiroko%20NAGATA.php nytimes.com/1975/08/06/archives/raiders-are-part-of-a-loose-alliance-of-japanese-extremists.html

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Daniel Halliday
May 31
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DH edited this paragraph
By February 1972, just a few years after declaring war on the state of Japan, paranoia and distrust were leading leftist student revolutionary groups in Japan to splinter and become increasingly violent. This period was most famously marked by a bloody purge in which the United Red Army’s (URA) leadership ordered 8 members to be beaten to death while leaving 6 more outside to freeze to death. In the chaos that followed the arrest of the URA, five members fled, took a hostage and barricaded themselves in a guesthouse in a nearby town. What followed was ten-day standoff between these URA members and police that came to be known as the Asama-Sansō incident. This incident generated an intense backlash in Japanese society, with radical leftist groups losing significant support in the coming years, effectively destroying the leftist movement in Japan, in this way the Japanese leftist revolution was over before it had even began.
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