D H
Jul 9 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

Why is Belarus Europe’s last dictatorship?

Belarus is a landlocked country, bordered by Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Latvia, and formerly part of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union. Belarus is often called Europe’s last dictatorship on account of the country only having one authoritarian government since 1994, that of Alexander Lukashenko. Lukanshenko is so repressive and comfortable with these authoritarian accusations he is even been famously quoted as saying, “better to be a dictator than be gay.” But what is it about Belarus that enabled such a stable dictatorship and allowed the country to remain a European outlier? Why is Belarus Europe’s last dictatorship? telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/belarus/9122050/Better-to-be-a-dictator-than-be-gay-declares-Belarus-leader.html
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History and relations with Russia
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History and relations with Russia

In 1922 Belarus helped form the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and enjoyed nearly a decade of cultural development, gaining a distinct class of intellectuals, poets, and authors. However during the 1930s Stalin’s paranoid purges led to the eradication of the Belarusian intelligentsia by death or exile. This period of harmful Russian relations laid the foundations for dictatorship to flourish, something compounded further and favoured by Russia presently under Vladimir Putin, with both Belarus and Ukraine acting as a geographic buffer against Europe and NATO. According to Oleksiy Honcharenko, of Ukraine’s European Solidarity Party, Putin is a common problem for both Belarus and Ukraine, stating, “Putin finds the change of power in the way that it happened in Ukraine during the revolutions unacceptable, and this seems to be the only way in which it can happen in Belarus.” [1]

belarusdigest.com/story/stalins-victims-in-belarus-to-remain-unburied-and-nameless taipeitimes.com/News/editorials/archives/2020/07/09/2003739614 [1] charter97.org/en/news/2020/7/9/385224

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D H
Jul 10
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DH edited this paragraph
In 1922 Belarus helped form the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and enjoyed nearly a decade of cultural development, gaining a distinct class of intellectuals, poets, and authors. However during the 1930s Stalin’s paranoid purges led to the eradication of the Belarusian intelligentsia by death or exile. This period of harmful Russian relations laid the foundations for dictatorship to flourish, something compounded further and favoured by Russia presently under Vladimir Putin, with both Belarus and Ukraine acting as a geographic buffer against Europe and NATO. According to Oleksiy Honcharenko, of Ukraine’s European Solidarity Party, Putin is a common problem for both Belarus and Ukraine, stating, “Putin finds the change of power in the way that it happened in Ukraine during the revolutions unacceptable, and this seems to be the only way in which it can happen in Belarus.” [1]
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