Daniel Halliday
Mar 22 · Last update 1 day ago.

Does the coronavirus highlight the need for better global disaster contingency planning?

As the majority of the world is now dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns of global or regional recession and the socio-economic fallout from the outbreak are wide ranging. While some are concerned about repercussions in the stock market, others are already feeling the effects of sector-wide forced redundancies and bankruptcy, as the service industry grinds to a halt and governments scramble to minimise the long-term impacts of the pandemic. In light of this, does the world need to invest in better disaster aversion/management planning? Or does the world need larger systemic change in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic? theguardian.com/business/2020/feb/26/will-coronavirus-trigger-global-recession-donald-trump-trade-policy hospitalityandcateringnews.com/2020/03/uk-hospitality-and-catering-industry-stares-at-uncharted-covid-19-waters thehindu.com/business/most-airlines-may-fly-into-bankruptcy-on-covid-19-capa/article31084862.ece timesofmalta.com/articles/view/contingency-planning-for-covid-19.778466
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No, not possible to foresee
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Inequality and the need for systemic change
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No, not possible to foresee

While it is tempting to question the nature of societal infrastructure in times of global crisis it is important to recognise the very positive reactions to crises and fix the actual failings rather than wasting energy attempting to predict future crises. In this way realistic lessons can be learned from pandemics and some of those lessons may help actually avert future outbreaks anyway, and the clear lesson to be learned form COVID-19 is the need for more investment in healthcare. From the number of healthcare workers on strike internationally it is clear there are shortfalls in healthcare systems around the world, funding for not only better materials and equipment but better supply chain and data exchange infrastructure should be a key concern not only during the pandemic but moving forward also. Likewise simple hygiene practices, and education around disease prevention, safe handling of wild animals and basic biology to combat fake news should be the concern of all global powers, as studies have revealed a shocking lack of hygiene practices in even the world’s most developed countries.

apnews.com/Business%20Wire/29b86615b3c74a648f6300215ef937b3 msn.com/en-us/news/us/in-photos-healthcare-workers-protest-amid-coronavirus-outbreak/ss-BB11Qlrn ehrintelligence.com/news/covid-19-exposes-lack-of-health-data-exchange-interoperability

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 1
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Inequality and the need for systemic change

Markets have limited scope to deal with disasters, so fiscal measures need to be put in place, and social safety nets of some sort need to be maintained so that, in times of crisis, desperate situations do not become much much worse than they have to be. With a third of US citizens not receiving paid sick leave, people cannot just stay home even in times of massive viral outbreak, many illnesses are needlessly spread in this way due to the lack of social welfare infrastructure. Meanwhile the World Health Organisation’s simple message during this pandemic is to “test test test” as a measure to stay ahead of the virus, but many countries have no healthcare system, wide spread poverty, and are incapable of carrying out reasonable efforts to contain the outbreak, with even some of the world’s richest countries struggling to deal with it. In this way capitalism has failed to construct a system that works, and societies need to have comprehensive social safety nets in place, this pandemic is pulling back on the curtain on the rampant inequality in global systems, and highlighting an urgent need for deep changes worldwide.

washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/01/15/more-than-a-third-of-american-workers-dont-get-sick-leave-and-theyre-making-the-rest-of-us-ill reuters.com/article/us-healthcare-coronavirus-who/world-health-organization-says-test-test-test-for-coronavirus-idUSKBN2132S4 cbsnews.com/news/coronavirus-amazon-lysol-price-gouging

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Daniel Halliday
Mar 23
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DH edited this paragraph
Markets have limited scope to deal with disasters, so fiscal measures need to be put in place, and social safety nets of some sort need to be maintained so that, in times of crisis, desperate situations do not become much much worse than they have to be. With a third of US citizens not receiving paid sick leave, people cannot just stay home even in times of massive viral outbreak, many illnesses are needlessly spread in this way due to the lack of social welfare infrastructure. Meanwhile the World Health Organisation’s simple message during this pandemic is to “test test test” as a measure to stay ahead of the virus, but many countries have no healthcare system, wide spread poverty, and are incapable of carrying out reasonable efforts to contain the outbreak, with even some of the world’s richest countries struggling to deal with it. In this way capitalism has failed to construct a system that works, and societies need to have comprehensive social safety nets in place, this pandemic is pulling back on the curtain on the rampant inequality in global systems, and highlighting an urgent need for deep changes worldwide.
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