Daniel Halliday
Jul 30 · Last update 4 mo. ago.
Could technology be used to combat election rigging?
Following the US, the EU and Japan refusing to verify Cambodia’s disputably flawed elections, could technology be used to provide a corruption proof voting system?
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Voting technology IS changing, but the question of voter intimidation has been left unanswered
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There are various social factors to consider associated with electronic voting
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Electronic voting is rife with problems and security issues
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Cryptographic solutions like blockchain could change the face of voting
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Voting technology IS changing, but the question of voter intimidation has been left unanswered

In the example of Cambodia, it wasn’t so much the faking of votes that was the problem but the intimidation of voters and the imprisonment of the government's main opposition. What can technology do that it already isn’t to stop this from occurring? In fact, in these situations electronic voting may amplify intimidation and fear, as a proportion of all societies will inevitably not understand how electronic voting systems work. These individuals may therefore feel more overwhelmed and intimidated by questions of security and loss of anonymity.

Following relatively free and fair elections in 2017, the Cambodian government dismantled the opposition and imprisoned its leader on charges of treason. While this in itself may serve to intimidate voters into voting a certain way, Prime Minister Hun Sen’s bloody coup to maintain his grip on power in the 90’s, and election irregularities in 2013 further instil distrust in the voting process also. While technology can be utilised to deal with these issues of corruption as well, technology used in the voting process does come close to addressing issues such as these.

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Daniel Halliday
Aug 25
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DH edited this paragraph
Following relatively free and fair elections in 2017, the Cambodian government dismantled the opposition and imprisoned its leader on charges of treason. While this in itself may serve to intimidate voters into voting a certain way, Prime Minister Hun Sen’s bloody coup to maintain his grip on power in the 90’s, and election irregularities in 2013 further instil distrust in the voting process also. While technology can be utilised to deal with these issues of corruption as well, technology used in the voting process does come close to addressing issues such as these.
There are various social factors to consider associated with electronic voting

Out of all the countries that have started to implement electronic voting in some way, only Estonia and Switzerland have conducted surveys to determine the multifaceted effects electronic voting has on the voting process. These studies have shown that, far from making the voting process fairer and open to all, electronic voting seemed to yield a disproportionate amount of younger, richer, tech savvy voters. Also the voter turnout seemed to be unaffected or actually decrease. It seems electronic voting, far from alleviating problems from the voting system, seems to actually generate new ones.

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Electronic voting is rife with problems and security issues

Electronic voting is currently being used in two different forms, utilising electronic interfaces that voters interact with to cast votes, and fully integrated online voting systems that minimise expense by acquiring electronic votes and then accumulating them online. Both forms have been criticised heavily for placing issues of election expenses above election security. Security experts have argued it isn’t just the issue of data manipulation that is the major problem here, but also the added complexity of possible computer malfunction what could colour the outcome of the election.

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Cryptographic solutions like blockchain could change the face of voting

Electronic voting systems are already being utilised in India, Brazil, Venezuela and the United States. However Estonia is leading the way with internet based electronic voting systems, also seen in Switzerland, and parts of Canada, France and the US. However the methods currently implemented have been criticised as still being susceptible to fraudulent activity, and they may not protect voter anonymity while maintaining result transparency.

Blockchain could be utilised to have a verifiable decentralised database of votes. The decentralised secure ledger that blockchain technology provides would allow the record of votes to be kept secure and identical on a wide group of servers. While the cryptographic nature of blockchain could guarantee voter anonymity while supplying a system that is fully open to public scrutiny. This would allow voting to become tamperproof, transparent, more accessible, more affordable and tensionless.

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Latest conversation
Daniel Halliday
Aug 20
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DH edited this paragraph
Electronic voting systems are already being utilised in India, Brazil, Venezuela and the United States. However Estonia is leading the way with internet based electronic voting systems, also seen in Switzerland, and parts of Canada, France and the US. However the methods currently implemented have been criticised as still being susceptible to fraudulent activity, and they may not protect voter anonymity while maintaining result transparency.
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