Daniel Halliday
Nov 24 · Last update 16 days ago.

What’s behind the situation in Bolivia?

Accusations of electoral fraud followed the Bolivian 2019 general election, which sparked protests in the country. Following a political standoff and the police and army becoming increasingly involved in managing the protests, the military subsequently demanded Evo Morales to resign, which he did and sought political asylum in Mexico. An interim government has stepped in as protests have descended into increasingly violent standoffs between pro-Morales counter-protesters and police and the army, with the UN criticising their excessive use of force. Reportage of the incident has variable called the situation a coup or has merely mentioned that Morales has described it as a coup, so what is really going on in Bolivia?
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Political unrest being painted as a coup
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A coup and a foreign aided coup at that
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Political unrest being painted as a coup

During the political unrest that followed a victory for Evo Morales in Bolivia’s 2019 general election, the country’s former president was forced out due to mass protests at the election interference that led to Morales' re-election, following a questionable pause in the vote count. Morales responded to the escalating unrest with indifference until the army then stepped in, providing what they call a “strategic essential public service” after they had exhausted options of dialogue. Morales was asked to stand down and subsequently left the country, and both Morales and his supporters have denounced these events as a coup. The interim government under Jeanine Anez have blamed Morales for the escalation in violence by holding on to power, but concern has also arisen internationally over the caretaker government’s allowance of a military crackdown to quash protests.

edition.cnn.com/2019/11/20/americas/bolivia-unrest-intl-hnk/index.html

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Daniel Halliday
Nov 28
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A coup and a foreign aided coup at that

Morales called it before it happened, stating in late October that the opposition was planning a coup, and it has continued even though Bolivia's electoral tribunal found no evidence of fraud. Since then the Interim government have immediately threatened to arrest protesters for subversion and have warned journalists not to commit sedition. Meanwhile the army and the police have used a disproportionate amount of force with tear gas and live ammunition used on peaceful or unarmed protesters. Members of the interim government have claimed that no bullets have been fired despite widespread accounts that contradict this, and the interim government has been widely labelled as a dictatorship. The Interim government has now launched an investing into Morales for terrorism and have arrested the vice president of MAS (Movement for Socialism), Morales’ political party. Furthermore the leaked 16 audio recordings that Morales spoke of in October have been released online demonstrating that the opposition did in fact plan a coup and worked with members of the U.S., Brazilian, and Colombian governments.

theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/23/bolivia-evo-morales-coup-accusation-opposition-foreign-powers dw.com/en/bolivias-electoral-tribunal-denies-fraud-amid-protests/a-51175904 aa.com.tr/en/americas/bolivia-some-70k-fake-anti-morales-twitter-ids-created/1649627 uk.reuters.com/article/uk-bolivia-election-idUKKBN1XS29A nytimes.com/2019/11/20/world/americas/bolivia-deaths-sentaka.html en24.news/news/2019/11/10/bolivia-audios-leaked-from-opposition-leaders-calling-for-a-coup-against-evo-morales.html

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Daniel Halliday
Nov 24
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