Daniel Halliday
Nov 2 · Last update 3 mo. ago.
What are the latest breakthroughs in diabetes research?
The number of people worldwide suffering from some form of diabetes is thought to have doubled since the 1980’s. What breakthroughs have been made in the prevention, treatment, or care of diabetic people?
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Low carbohydrate diets
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Drugs
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Genetic clues
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Sernova Cell Pouch
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Low carbohydrate diets

While it may not be the biggest breakthrough it does have surprising efficacy with a range of biological problems and diseases. Dietary treatment of diabetes is probably the oldest technique for controlling the disease with numerous methods being suggested before the discovery of insulin in 1922. As the body of a diabetic struggles to cope with food, doctors have often prescribed controlling the types of food entering the body to ease the stress of digestion, many diets have been suggested but the pattern that runs through them all is low carbohydrate intake.

While the subject remains controversial, diets such as vegan, vegetarian, ketogenic, glycemic index, low carb, and high fibre diets all involve lowering carbohydrate intake while increasing dietary-fibre. This leads to patients feeling fuller for longer, while needing less insulin to process the sugar and carbohydrates present in the food. These diets have effectively reversed the disease for many sufferers of diabetes and remain the first course of treatment to pre-diabetics. diabetesstrong.com/ketogenic-diet-and-diabetes/#Conclusion_Is_a_keto_diet_good_for_people_with_diabetes

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Daniel Halliday
Feb 28
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DH edited this paragraph
While the subject remains controversial, diets such as vegan, vegetarian, ketogenic, glycemic index, low carb, and high fibre diets all involve lowering carbohydrate intake while increasing dietary-fibre. This leads to patients feeling fuller for longer, while needing less insulin to process the sugar and carbohydrates present in the food. These diets have effectively reversed the disease for many sufferers of diabetes and remain the first course of treatment to pre-diabetics. https://diabetesstrong.com/ketogenic-diet-and-diabetes/#Conclusion_Is_a_keto_diet_good_for_people_with_diabetes
Drugs

For type-1 diabetes insulin or synthetic insulin compounds has to be used as drug treatment, but there are a range of drugs used to fight Type-2 diabetes, which work by lowering blood sugar levels. Metformin is the most common drug that decreases the livers glucose production rate, but tests are underway on drugs that combine man-made insulin with Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) a hormone that the human body naturally secretes to lower bloody sugar. Drugs containing GLP-1 or working on the body’s GLP-1 metabolism (the breaking down of GLP-1) have demonstrated a positive effect on insulin levels, plus a long list of positive physiological benefits, both in the patient’s blood and a range of other tissues.

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Genetic clues

Researchers at the University of Stirling have recently discovered a new genetic signature in people who develop type 2 diabetes and fail to eliminate their risk through lifestyle alone. The study involved the analysis of 1000 tissue samples from patients undergoing five different treatment approaches. They isolated 16 genes that are can activate genetic activities that disturb insulin sensitivity further following standard diabetic lifestyle treatments. This is the first reliable genetic signature related to insulin sensitivity, and is thought to be potentially groundbreaking in regards to future diabetes research.

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Sernova Cell Pouch

Trials are currently underway in which researchers from the University of Chicago are testing a Cell Pouch System that could be transplanted into diabetes patients that require daily insulin injections. The perforated pouch is filled with insulin producing cells after it is transplanted into the patient's body, and essentially becomes an artificial insulin producing organ. While formerly healthy insulin producing cells could similarly be harvested from deceased donors and injected into a patients liver, the patient would then have to take immunosuppressant drugs for the rest of their lives, to stop their body attacking the donor cells. This new procedure utilises a special polymer material that has caused no immune response in previous trials and could be revolutionary in treating a multitude of deficiency diseases.

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