Daniel Halliday
Feb 2 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

What is being done about the world’s plastic crisis?

The level of plastic pollution has spiraled out of control as globalisation has progressed quicker than education and proper waste disposal infrastructure in most countries, and a plastic crisis has taken hold of the world's oceans and waterways. Eight million tons of plastic are believed to make it into the world’s oceans every year, and this level of plastic pollution is causing extensive harm to wildlife and even to human health as micro-plastics and plastic residues are increasingly being found in drinking water also. Plastic technology has advanced in recent decades and plastics are now more durable, some taking up to 400 years in order to degrade. However some individuals, organisations and even governments are taking on this uphill battle in addressing the plastic crisis. But what exactly is being done? nationalgeographic.com/environment/habitats/plastic-pollution
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Addressing the problem at its true source

Kamikatzu is a special Japanese town located in the forested mountains of Tokushima Prefecture, the town took on a “Zero Waste” policy in 2003, vowing to eliminate all waste for landfill or incinerator by 2020. The town’s transition to zero waste started with composting food waste in 1995 in order to cut down on expensive rubbish collection infrastructure. Then, as a result of Japan’s 1997 Container and Packaging Recycling Act, the local government sought recycling providers to reuse products from the towns rubbish and this grew over time. By 2016 residents were already well on their way to their zero waste goal, by this time sorting their garbage into 45 groups and then managing to recycle 81% of it. This policy needs to be put into place worldwide, with local governments taking the first step with education and coordinating with recycling providers, plastic is a problems that requires addressing and recycling as soon as it becomes rubbish, in households.

nippon.com/en/guide-to-japan/gu900038/the-kamikatsu-zero-waste-campaign-how-a-little-town-achieved-a-top-recycling-rate.html

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Daniel Halliday
Mar 4
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The Ocean Cleanup

Award winning Dutch engineer and inventor Boyan Slat started The Ocean Cleanup in 2013 with the sole intention of using cutting-edge technologies to actively remove plastics from the world’s rivers and oceans, with the aim to clean up 90% of ocean plastic pollution. Slat’s ocean cleanup system uses the ocean currents and a massive floating net to passively gather plastic pollution and is estimated to be likely to remove 50% of the Great Pacific Garbage patch in just five years. However the company moved on to address the source of plastic pollution by developing an autonomous solar-powered plastic collecting robot and barrier system, called the Interceptor, to filter out plastic pollution while allowing continuous commercial river use. The Interceptor is currently in use in Indonesia and Malaysia and stands to stem the flow of plastic into the world's oceans.

theoceancleanup.com/oceans theoceancleanup.com/rivers youtube.com/watch?v=ROW9F-c0kIQ

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Daniel Halliday
Feb 2
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