Daniel Halliday
Dec 5 · Last update 3 mo. ago.
Should the Canadian Trans Mountain pipeline expansion go ahead?
The issue of oil pipelines has been a matter of controversy in Canada for many decades, and this latest expansion is not without its share of debate. For this year’s International Mountain Day should we not consider the long term implication of such a project? With that in mind should this project really go ahead? un.org/en/events/mountainday
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This rekindling of an old issue in Canada now has bigger implications
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First Nations people: Impact and choice
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Canada should go ahead due to the economic benefits
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This rekindling of an old issue in Canada now has bigger implications

Protests have continued to grow as oil spills have repeated, with eight major oil spills occurring in the last ten years in Canada alone. However as increasing climate research has led to climate change being taken increasingly seriously by scientists and the general public alike, environmental issues have become one of the main pressing issues affecting Canada and the world in recent years. The implications of Trudeau’s policies concerning government owned pipeline expansion seem however at odds with his self proclaimed “unwavering commitment to fight climate change” narrative, and the Canadian government should rethink their involvement with such environmentally risky practices.

The first oil pipelines in Canada were the Interprovincial pipeline that began moving oil in 1950 and then the Trans Mountain pipeline that opened in 1953. The first debate on the Canadian pipeline issue however took place in the 1950's over the TransCanada pipeline, the countries first natural gas pipeline, which attracted public attention when five and a half kilometres of pipeline exploded in 1957. But it wasn’t until numerous oil spills in the 1970’s, the worst of these being the SS Arrow oil spill with 11,330 tons of crude oil covering 75 miles of coastline, that pipelines became a heavily protested issue.

novascotia.ca/museum/wrecks/wrecks/shipwrecks.asp?ID=468 pm.gc.ca/eng/news/2017/06/01/statement-prime-minister-canada-response-united-states-decision-withdraw-paris dictionary.sensagent.com/transcanada%20pipeline/en-en

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 19
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DH edited this paragraph
Protests have continued to grow as oil spills have repeated, with eight major oil spills occurring in the last ten years in Canada alone. However as increasing climate research has led to climate change being taken increasingly seriously by scientists and the general public alike, environmental issues have become one of the main pressing issues affecting Canada and the world in recent years. The implications of Trudeau’s policies concerning government owned pipeline expansion seem however at odds with his self proclaimed “unwavering commitment to fight climate change” narrative, and the Canadian government should rethink their involvement with such environmentally risky practices.
First Nations people: Impact and choice

First Nations people groups first became involved in this dispute in the 1970’s fearing a pipeline expansion would endanger not only the environment and wildlife in the region but would also complicate the many ongoing land and resource claims with the government. Even though previous reports led to government bans on pipeline expansion, development went ahead in the 80’s and the rights and wishes of the indigenous people in this region continued to be overlooked. The Dene people group were eventually persuaded to stand down on the matter in return for extra environmental protection efforts in the pipelines construction, but despite this spills and environmental issues continue.

However one proposed model for integrating First Nation’s people groups as majority shareholders, and giving them control over environmental protection schemes that can be put in place may change this long lasting standoff. The Eagle Spirit pipeline group currently has the support of 34 out of 35 First Nation groups to go ahead with a pipeline deal that may be beneficial for indigenous peoples, the environment and the Canadian economy alike.

theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/08/canada-oil-pipeline-first-nations-proposal-indigenous-rights reuters.com/article/us-canada-pipeline-leak-idUSKBN1572UJ

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 19
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DH edited this paragraph
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/08/canada-oil-pipeline-first-nations-proposal-indigenous-rights https://www.reuters.com/article/us-canada-pipeline-leak-idUSKBN1572UJ
Canada should go ahead due to the economic benefits

Such a project will help the government boost the economy to the point of being able to do more about climate change. Climate change is such a massive issue, economically benefiting in the short term is the only realistic way to address the massive price tag effective climate change policy will hold for the Canadian government. Canada also has a skilled labour shortage and is addressing this with unprecedented levels of migration; any possible employment opportunities will have a positive effect on the economy. New projects such as this represent a large employment opportunity, important for one of the leading immigrant friendly countries in the world.

In addition this may be the only way for Canada to afford to be a climate leader, as the desire of being a climate friendly country also carries a huge financial burden. But the profits made from such projects can be channelled into funding research, and more can ultimately be done about climate change and the environment. It could be accomplished by awarding the pipeline contract to energy suppliers that donate or sponsor research in the renewable energy sector and could represent a realistic middle ground.

theguardian.pe.ca/news/trans-mountain-controversy-follows-trudeau-to-london-202794 cbc.ca/news/canada/does-canada-really-have-a-skilled-labour-shortage-1.1342392

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Daniel Halliday
Mar 27
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
Such a project will help the government boost the economy to the point of being able to do more about climate change. Climate change is such a massive issue, economically benefiting in the short term is the only realistic way to address the massive price tag effective climate change policy will hold for the Canadian government. Canada also has a skilled labour shortage and is addressing this with unprecedented levels of migration; any possible employment opportunities will have a positive effect on the economy. New projects such as this represent a large employment opportunity, important for one of the leading immigrant friendly countries in the world.
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