Technology
Daniel Halliday
May 25 · Last update 3 mo. ago.
Should athlete doping be taken so seriously?
Detection seems to always be a step behind new doping techniques. With talk of gene doping being an eventual reality, does the ethics of sport need to progress with technology?
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Too difficult to draw the line between doping and reasonable use
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Maybe ethics should develop, for more potential improvement of human abilities
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Ethics always progresses with technology, but doping in sports could be a different story
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Too difficult to draw the line between doping and reasonable use

In the case of gene control, the crux of the argument would be the humanity of the matter, not progression in the ethics of sport. However, the borderline needs to remain clear, in order to judge whether any specific event is crossing the line morally.

This grey area could also apply to gene control when it becomes a practical reality in sport. The judgement of wrong usage could easily be arguable until there is a clear guideline of truly fair ethics, and some analysis in the ethics of how investigations are conducted. Although, considering that these rules may not fairly consider the nuances of all situations, it might be impossible to consolidate equally for all the cases of doping in the competing sports world. This will definately be made increasingly complicated in the case of gene doping. bbc.com/sport/athletics/39156296

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E. Sato
Jul 26
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DH edited this paragraph
In the case of gene control, the crux of the argument would be the humanity of the matter, not progression in the ethics of sport. However, the borderline needs to remain clear, in order to judge whether any specific event is crossing the line morally.
Maybe ethics should develop, for more potential improvement of human abilities

The rapid development of technology enables us to stick to old fashioned ethical standpoints in almost everything; science, medical procedures, and even art. Some issues did not get approved by the ethics of the time, for example Dolly the sheep in the 90s caused massive objections and there always seems to be ethical criticism against the justification of harming to animals for the greater good for humans. However, it is also known that the discovery of insulin came from animal testing on dogs, and this is continually appreciated by tens of thousands of diabetic patients.

On the other hand, gradual introduction to a new technology may have seen success in music and art. The revolutionary rise of CDs started in the 80s and brought up a massive dispute and saddened the music industry with the “death of music”, whereas the electric instruments that were used in almost all the popular music at that time were lambasted when they were first brought into Blues. Also, digitalised art is widely appreciated not only at museums but in every day life, even though historically the art was reserved for a handful of “cultured” people. Printing technology largely helped music and art spread through society, until the spring of broadcasting and the Internet in the 20th century.

It is impossible for us to ignore the development of technology and limit what we already have to what has been currently produced. In sports, although human bodies have become bigger and stronger thanks to the better nutrition that owes a lot to improved science and technology, it is no longer a valid point to restrict the players to being the size of an average person in the times of ancient Greece, at the time of the origin of the Olympics. As music only divided into smaller categories with the improvement of technology that varied styles, it might be the time for a new genre in sports to arise, a super human capabilities class, alongside an ordinary natural human abilities division. nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/insulin/discovery-insulin.html

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Ethics always progresses with technology, but doping in sports could be a different story

As the term “ethics” is defined as “moral principles” (Oxford dictionary), it should perpetually move onward with the development of society. However, in regard to doping, it doesn’t necessarily come across as a pure argument of technology and ethics. That is because the core issue seems to lie in the immutable reasons for doping; pure (in a way) ambition of winning, or possible greed, as the sports industry could also bring an enormous impact on an athletes personal economic state.

Nevertheless, there is concern beyond the point of fairness in sport. For example, there have been cases of athletes being illegally doped by coaches, without the athletes’ consent or even acknowledgement. The recent exposures of the systematic doping in China and Russia have led to the suspicion of corruption in both domestic and international anti-doping associations. This prompts concern over loosing impartiality regarding the “ethics of sport”, of which fundamental ideas are thought to be perdurable and shared internationally. On the other hand, there was a time when East Germany shocked the world for having cultivated super humans by doping them from an early age. In this case, the argument focuses even more on the humanity of the situation, which would probably reinforce the ethical aspect of it. Nevertheless, morals can vary in different societies and could depend on the improvement of ethics in the society in question. Either way the diversity of “morals” is likely to be the key element to try integrate moving forward in the ethics of sport, so that cheating is unattractive method of success.

Therefore, the consideration needs to start from speculating on the necessity of adjusting the broader concept of “ethics”, and the possibilities and righteousness of stepping into other cultures and societies. As much as the development of doping technique takes time, it would be a moderate change for the world to come to a recognition/agreement in the rise of the problem. And by the time this happens, there will be a whole new technique to catch up with. Although as a short-term approach, there is no reason to stop tackling the doping problem with current ethical standards, or trying to pull up discipline in the industry. youtube.com/watch?v=iu9B-ty9JCY youtube.com/watch?v=TfF7hd3IsGo

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