Daniel Halliday
Jan 20 ยท Last update 3 mo. ago.
Could technology eventually cause politicians to become obsolete?
With the advent of AI set to revolutionise the world as we know it, the fear of automation leading to a multitude of job losses, or job obsolescence, seems to be a looming reality. With some studies suggesting public sector jobs are most vulnerable to this change; could this go as far as affecting government roles? Could technological developments aid voting, national decision making and international diplomacy to such an extent that democracy itself could be revolutionised through automation or networking? Could technology lead to a realistic, and less expensive, alternative to politicians being developed? theguardian.com/society/2016/oct/25/850000-public-sector-jobs-automated-2030-oxford-university-deloitte-study
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No, technology and politics are a bad combination
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Technology will facilitate roles not replace them
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Regardless of job losses the revolution will be decentralised
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No, technology and politics are a bad combination

Increasing technology in politics will just lead to further corrupt practices and help to consolidate power for those who can afford to wage the most sophisticated hacking campaigns. Just look at the amount of hacking, misinformation, and election interference that is so common and disruptive today, if the process of politics is aided even more by technology problems such as this will become more and more commonplace. We are also on the verge of introducing technology into the process of voting, something that online security experts have warned against, and a dangerous reality that threatens to undermine the whole democratic process.

technologyreview.com/s/611850/why-security-experts-hate-that-blockchain-voting-will-be-used-in-the-midterm-elections

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Technology will facilitate roles not replace them

There is nothing to adequately replace people within this line of work, as the political landscape will always be in need of the human touch and human accountability. As with most applications of AI and IoT solutions it looks as if technology will increasingly augment people in lines of work such as this rather than take over, especially in jobs that require an application of morals where there may sometimes be no clear right and wrong answer. Technology may not threaten all jobs, just minimise the amount of assistance needed by one politician, teams and campaigns may be smaller, but people will still be needed to run things.

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Regardless of job losses the revolution will be decentralised

Blockchain and smart contract technology could revolutionise government accountability and prevent campaign promises from being broken. This may not lead to the same amount of job losses in other fields of work, as this distributed ledger technology may just affect the way agreements, policies and voting systems are clearly and openly structured and maintained rather than replace physical job roles. It is painfully clear however that the world of politics is in dire need of a transparency shake-up; it just requires the human step to be taken towards transparency and compliance with technology that has so far mostly eluded the political world.

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