Daniel Halliday
Jan 27 ยท Last update 20 days ago.
Does the Arab slave trade amount to a forgotten African holocaust?
While we use this day to remember those that died as victims of the Holocaust in an effort to not let this enormous tragedy repeat itself, are we just scratching the surface of the history of inhumane acts we should in fact be striving to remember? Have we missed many other historical acts of genocide that, like the Holocaust, still have a deep ongoing social impact to this day? With the way in which the Arab slave trade was operated is it fair to argue that it was carried out with genocidal intent? un.org/en/holocaustremembrance/2019/calendar2019.html
Stats of Viewpoints
Yes, castration makes genocidal intent unquestionable
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Viewpoints
Add New Viewpoint
Yes, castration makes genocidal intent unquestionable

Although it is hard to calculate exact numbers in such events, especially ones so clouded by history, the Arab salve trade that spanned Africa, Western Asia and parts of Europe from medieval times until the 20th century undoubtedly led to far more deaths than more historically resent acts of genocide. Anthropologist Tidiane Ndiaye calculates that 17 million individuals fell victim to the Arab slave trade, and points out that the wide practice of castration led to those individuals essentially being genetically erased from history. Although over a protracted period, this number dwarfs other historic acts of enslavement, and the evidence of wide spread castration indicates the intent to destroy these people as a group.

Agree
Disagree
Translate