Daniel Halliday
Feb 24 · Last update 6 mo. ago.

Why did the US occupy Nicaragua from 1909 until 1930?

In the early 20th century the United States occupied Nicaragua for 21 years, what was the US’ justification and/or real reason behind this, and what has it led to?
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Ended by the Great Depression
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As part of the Banana Wars
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To protect US interests in the failed Nicaragua Canal
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Ended by the Great Depression

Nicaragua was occupied under the Bryan-Chamorro Treaty as a quasi-protectorate of the United States, giving the US the rights to any canal in indefinitely and to occupy the Gulf of Fonseca and various islands in the country on a renewable 99 year lease. Therefore Nicaragua would have continued as a US protectorate, if it wasn’t for the Great Depression which brought an end to it due to the cost of military and financial investments in Nicragua, and the fight against guerrilla armies led by Augusto C sar Sandino. The Bryan-Chamorro treaty was not abolished until 1970 under the Nixon administration, if it was not for the great depression Nicragua may have still been occupied in some way by the United States.

gale.com/intl/c/nicaragua-political-instability-and-us-intervention-1910-1933

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Daniel Halliday
May 25
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As part of the Banana Wars

The US occupied Nicaragua as it was perceived to be a destabilising influence in the region; however this was just part of a pattern of US interference in the Caribbean, Central America and beyond in what has been come to know as the "Banana Wars". The reason for these conflicts has often been put down to the US establishing itself as an international policing force to help reconcile warring, lawless or corrupted states, however this period led to the US domination of trade in the region and the beginning of US economic empiricism. This period laid the foundation for the US’ international economic colonial activities and global interventionism that defined the Cold War and continues internationally to the present day.

allthatsinteresting.com/banana-wars

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 11
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To protect US interests in the failed Nicaragua Canal

From 1909 the US began to support a conservative rebellion against the Nicaraguan president José Santos Zelaya following differences over the planned construction of a canal through Nicaragua linking the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. After Zelaya’s heavy handed execution of five hundred revolutionaries and two United States citizens the US sent warships to Nicaragua prompting Zelaya to abdicate. Following further instability United States marines occupied the country in 1912, leading to the signing of the Bryan-Chamorro Treaty, giving control over the planned canal to the United States. Overall this occupation amounted to a pointless invention for a failed construction project, and proved to be a destabilising force in the country, leading to long periods of repeated military dictatorships.

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Daniel Halliday
Feb 24
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