History > History of War > WW1
Daniel Halliday
Jun 16 · Last update 18 days ago.
What can we learn from the First World War?
The First World War ended 100 years ago this year, and was one of the deadliest conflicts in history. What can we learn strategically, politically and diplomatically so that tragic events such as these do not repeat themselves in the future?
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It is dangerous for political powers to drag their feet when it comes to war
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0 disagrees
Wars of attrition are a pointless waste of life
2 agrees
0 disagrees
Not to impose unrealistic sanctions, reparations, or tariffs on a country to damage their economy
2 agrees
0 disagrees
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It is dangerous for political powers to drag their feet when it comes to war

America’s reluctance to get involved with WW1, in what it saw as Europeans destroying themselves, allowed the war to spiral out of control from 1914 to 1917. It wasn’t until America intervened in August 1918 that German Forces were pushed back, leading to an armistice later that year. In the current global climate, with brutal civil wars and bloody disputes being fought all over the world, it would seem that failing to act decisively when it comes to war is still an issue that plagues international diplomacy today.

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Wars of attrition are a pointless waste of life

Attrition warfare is the concept of trying to wear down the enemy forces until they can no longer continue to fight. This may be caused by an overwhelming economic loss or devastating loss of life to an enemy that causes them to surrender or be unable to fight. This disastrous non-strategy is the one of the worst elements of warfare that considers combatants as expendable and regards loss of life as acceptable and sustainable as long as the enemies levels of both are worse.

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Not to impose unrealistic sanctions, reparations, or tariffs on a country to damage their economy

The Treaty of Versailles was the treaty signed at the end of the WW1. Article 231 of the treaty forced Germany to limit its military capabilities, give up its colonies and some territory, and to pay massive reparations to the Allied Forces. This was thought to have caused the post war hyperinflation by the German population and did contribute to it to a large degree. This then caused German nationalism to smoulder and was the beginning of anti-Jewish sentiment in Germany.

Reparations such as these or similar economic sanctions breed isolation, backwardness and contempt, and should be used as a last resort as they only worsen international relations.

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