D H
Aug 23, 2020 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

Is the Second World War being misinterpreted to serve political ends?

The Second World War was a catastrophic conflict and a difficult subject to elucidate both at the time and in retrospect. However over seven decades after the largest conflict in history our understanding of the World War Two remains somewhat dependent on conventional understanding, propaganda and sometimes slanted misinterpretations. A clear example of this is in a White House press release to commemorate VE Day from May 2020, in which Donald Trump praised only "America and Great Britain" for "victory over the Nazis", clearly missing some of the largest contributions and sacrifices made by many other nations in stopping Nazi expansion. What are the popular misinterpretations that permeate this period of history at present? Could these examples of how the Second World War has been remembered incorrectly suit political ends? Or are they innocent examples of history being written by the victors? indy100.com/article/trump-ve-day-video-united-states-uk-allied-forces-world-war-ii-9507331
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The misbranding of the atomic bomb
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A war of production
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Who "won" the war
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The misbranding of the atomic bomb

The atomic bombing of Japan is often justified as ending the war, as the only alternative to a land invasion of the country and is credited as saving further loss of life in the war, however this is somewhat revisionist and there is a lot of evidence that goes directly against these common assertions. Based on Japanese records, the latest scholarship has proven that the bombing did not end Japan’s participation in the war, but the unexpected entry of the Soviet Union against Japan on August 8th 1945 was a greater shock to the Imperial government. The only alternative to the bombing being land invasion is another myth that is contradicted by American military records which show the America’s plotted demonstrating the power of this weapon to the Japan by targeting uninhabited islands, beaches or a landmark such a Mount Fuji, but the American military decided upon a civilian population, something that should clearly be remembered as a war crime. Muddying the history of the Second World War in this way has allowed America to avoid paying reparations for war crimes, and has overshadowed and obfuscated the anti-war movement which throughout the cold war looked increasingly unlikely under the massive threat of nuclear war.

washingtonpost.com/opinions/five-myths-about-the-atomic-bomb/2015/07/31/32dbc15c-3620-11e5-b673-1df005a0fb28_story.html theweek.com/articles/716819/atomic-bombings-hiroshima-nagasaki-war-crimes-full-stop

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D H
Oct 31
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A war of production

People concentrate on the strategy and tactics of war with no regard for the operational reality of the war effort, Britain often depicts WWII as a sort of David and Goliath myth, a small island nation against the Teutonic efficiency of the Germans, but looking at the war from an operational level makes this seem far from the truth. Britain did have a smaller army but their mantra was “steel not flesh” and so they built a massive air force of 132,500 aircraft, 50,000 more than the Germany's, likewise the dent German U-Boats made to British shipping was substantial but nowhere near the level need to bring this superpower to its knees. Many of the narratives of World War II fall apart when looking at it on an operational level, but not doing so feeds into the great man theory and allows people to glorify the leaders and soldiers of war and build the memory of war as a myth rather than an organised operational feat.

nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/fake-history-what-you-think-you-know-about-world-war-ii-likely-wrong-27397

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D H
Oct 30
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Who "won" the war

Just like the White House press statement, responsibility for defeating the fascism is often put in the hands of the United States and the Britain exclusively, despite 80% of the Nazi casualties being at the hands of the Soviet Union. The Soviet's contribution to the war is often left out in the United States and Europe, and the cold war turn around their treatment by the US as a post war ally is also shocking, but arguably this decision is massively financial. Economically this war transformed the American economy, and reversing that might have forced the country back into depression, after the war the US decided to adapt an ally into a new enemy to continue the American war economy, birthing the military industrial complex.

moneywise.com/a/financial-facts-about-world-war-ii independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/ve-day-70th-anniversary-we-should-never-forget-the-soviets-won-world-war-ii-in-europe-10239369.html

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D H
Aug 23, 2020
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