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Oct 12 · Last update 2 days ago.

Should Columbus Day be officially replaced with Indigenous People’s Day?

Columbus Day marks the anniversary of Christopher Columbus’s arrival in the Americas in 1492 on the 12th October, and is celebrated mainly in the United States. However Columbus Day has long been a source of controversy, with Columbus being a symbol of the destructive European colonisation that occurred across the American continent and Christopher Columbus being a controversial character himself. This year US President Joe Biden officially declared October 11th a national holiday to celebrate Indigenous People’s Day, a long-running counter-celebration/protest held on the same day as Columbus Day. But what does this mean for Columbus Day? Is it time to stop celebrating Columbus Day in favour of Indigenous People’s Day?
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No

There are already other celebrations for that for American natives, states such as California and Tennessee celebrate Native American Day not on Columbus Day but in September, and in Washington state it's celebrated in November, rolling out an additional holiday would be much less divisive than replacing one. One good suggest would by the United States recognising and marking August 9th as a federal holiday for the Indigenous people of America, as this is the same date the United Nations declared International Day of the World's Indigenous People, the US should join other nations around the world in celebrating their indigenous community's culture. You shouldn’t erase modern American history and culture in favour of another and neither should history be whitewashed, all our histories were bloody and ugly, one culture's history shouldn’t be romanticised above another's.

washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/10/14/we-could-abolish-columbus-day-we-shouldnt un.org/en/observances/indigenous-day

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D H
Oct 26
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
There are already other celebrations for that for American natives, states such as California and Tennessee celebrate Native American Day not on Columbus Day but in September, and in Washington state it's celebrated in November, rolling out an additional holiday would be much less divisive than replacing one. One good suggest would by the United States recognising and marking August 9th as a federal holiday for the Indigenous people of America, as this is the same date the United Nations declared International Day of the World's Indigenous People, the US should join other nations around the world in celebrating their indigenous community's culture. You shouldn’t erase modern American history and culture in favour of another and neither should history be whitewashed, all our histories were bloody and ugly, one culture's history shouldn’t be romanticised above another's.

Yes

Columbus day should be abolished and what better way than to replace it with Indigenous People’s Day, taking into consideration the history of the Americas and the lingering inequality and discrimination surrounding indigenous communities all over the ENTIRE CONTINENT. Furthermore Columbus is a myth, he landed in the Caribbean in the Bahamas not where the United States came to be, he enslaved and mutilated the Taino people he came into contact with, he is far removed from the history and people of the United States, historically and culturally, so why is this history celebrated in the US? A Catholic priest, Bartolomé de las Casas, wrote of the region under Columbus' governorship at the time; stated that it was marked by "insatiable greed", filled with acts "so foreign to human nature", and employing "the strangest and most varied new methods of cruelty" [1].

This period of American history is wholly disgusting and not was not as amicable as is commonly believed, Columbus was not a discoverer or civilising force but a rapist, a slaver and a torturer. Columbus was also not the first European to ‘discover’ the Americas, European fisherman had made the journey further north and established settlements on the east coast of North America, Columbus was just the first to establish an brutal and exploitative relation to the American natives. In light of modern moral standards and an in-depth understanding of history should we not shape modern culture to reflect the measured and honest grasp we have on the history of America? Yes we should, and yes Columbus Day should not be celebrated, but in its place Indigenous Peoples Day would be useful in educating and enlightening the American continent.

blockclubchicago.org/2021/10/11/its-time-to-replace-columbus-day-with-indigenous-peoples-day-in-illinois-activists-say-at-monday-rally theodysseyonline.com/we-should-stop-celebrating-columbus-day theguardian.com/science/1999/nov/28/archaeology.uknews [1] web.archive.org/web/20091020025030/http://geocities.com/CapitolHill/Lobby/4621/columbusday.html u.osu.edu/posterchildchristophercolumbus/villain-columbus

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D H
Oct 15
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
Columbus day should be abolished and what better way than to replace it with Indigenous People’s Day, taking into consideration the history of the Americas and the lingering inequality and discrimination surrounding indigenous communities all over the ENTIRE CONTINENT. Furthermore Columbus is a myth, he landed in the Caribbean in the Bahamas not where the United States came to be, he enslaved and mutilated the Taino people he came into contact with, he is far removed from the history and people of the United States, historically and culturally, so why is this history celebrated in the US? A Catholic priest, Bartolomé de las Casas, wrote of the region under Columbus' governorship at the time; stated that it was marked by "insatiable greed", filled with acts "so foreign to human nature", and employing "the strangest and most varied new methods of cruelty" [1].
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