D H
Jul 7 ยท Last update 2 mo. ago.

What can be done about international medical oxygen shortages?

A second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic hit India in March 2021 and the country was gripped by a health crisis, one made worse by shortages of vaccines, medicines, hospital beds, and especially oxygen cylinders. Throughout May 2021 deaths had surged to several thousand a day in India, as this oxygen under-supply crisis rendered hospitals unable to provide this basic medical asset for their patients requiring intensive care. But oxygen shortage were not limited to India, the same happened in the preceding months as Brazil was battered by COVID, and in the following months in Argentina, Iran, Nepal, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Pakistan, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, South Africa, Indonesia, and many more countries. To complicate matters further Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Myanmar, are reliant on India's supply of oxygen. What is causing the international oxygen shortage crisis? What can be done to solve these medical oxygen shortages? aljazeera.com/news/2021/5/3/india-covid-cases-near-20-million-uk-to-send-more-aid-live-news worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/india
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Cooperation
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Countries need to take up World Bank donations
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Infrastructure
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Cooperation

The fixation on ventilators and vaccines during the COVID pandemic has caused what should have been foreseen to reach crisis proportions. Oxygen shortages have been costing living in Africa for years and scant supplies are now being redirected from vital children's wards and maternity units in over 40 oxygen short countries to deal with COVID patients. The world needs to urgently invest in preparation infrastructure, COVID is not going away and is likely to be a flu-like epidemic that worsens in certain areas annually or even randomly moving forward. Such a scheme would be best spearheaded by an organisation such as the WHO, UN member states should increase donations and cooperate more on oxygen supply. Likewise governments and international groups could form advance-purchase agreements with international suppliers, forming better regional emergency stores of oxygen that could be readily available to various parts of the world as needed.

msn.com/en-gb/news/world/act-now-to-prevent-oxygen-shortage-in-covid-hit-countries-say-campaigners/ar-BB1gh4SF thenakedscientists.com/articles/interviews/covids-oxygen-crisis nytimes.com/2021/05/04/world/oxygen-shortage-covid.html

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D H
Aug 3
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Countries need to take up World Bank donations

Supply will sadly always follow behind surges in demand and that will be slower during pandemic lockdowns, impeding businesses less during lockdowns and pandemics is therefore a good thing so that this economic reality doesn't breed major shortages like we have seen with oxygen. Oxygen is also a complex resource, as tanks of oxygen cost around ten times more than pumping it through pipes into a hospital, therefore hard to reach places are most dependent on expensive tanks of oxygen, and often deal with poorest communities. Increase supply is the only way out of this crisis, and this will be balanced out over time when companies realise there are new demands to supply to, sadly in areas that are too remote this will remain an issue that may lead to death before the gap in the market is filled. As a result we have seen a surge of new oxygen plants announced in countries such as India, but the World Bank has warned that many countries have not yet applied for their emergency multi-billion loan scheme to upgrade oxygen systems.

indianexpress.com/article/india/pm-cares-fund-oxygen-generation-plants-coronavirus-pandemic-7288290 advisory.com/daily-briefing/2021/01/08/oxygen

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D H
Aug 3
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Infrastructure

There is no oxygen crisis, there are massive infrastructure problems in many parts of the world that shows up shocking gaps in the supply of this essential resource, COVID-19 has just highlighted this issue. In countries like India we have seen industry and mining clearly has possession of enough oxygen often in the same regions whose medical systems are running dangerously low on medical oxygen. To prevent the tragedies we have seen in India in other lower income countries, developed countries should be rushing to help these nations build adequate emergency oxygen infrastructure. The world's biggest medical gas suppliers mostly supply to military and industry in high-income countries, with the COVID pandemic raging on, we need better global infrastructure so that medical oxygen supply can reach even the poorest and most remote communities.

theguardian.com/global-development/2021/may/25/oxygen-shortages-threaten-total-collapse-of-dozens-of-health-systems msn.com/en-gb/news/world/act-now-to-prevent-oxygen-shortage-in-covid-hit-countries-say-campaigners/ar-BB1gh4SF

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D H
Jul 7
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