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Jul 30 · Last update 2 mo. ago.

Is it time for the UK Parliament to review their archaic rules?

On 22 July 2021, Dawn Butler, a Member of UK Parliament, was forced to leave the House of Commons by acting-speaker of the house for repeatedly calling Prime Minister Boris Johnson a liar. Butler outlined a number of occasions in which Johnson misled the public in recent months, and according to UK parliamentary rules Members of Parliament (MPs) are not allowed to accuse one another of lying in the House of Commons. Acting Deputy Speaker Judith Cummins asked Butler to reconsider her words, but Butler refused and repeated that Johnson had lied and was banned from parliament for the rest of the day. Is Boris Johnson a liar? Was Dawn Butler wrong to make these comments about the Prime Minister? Or, this a case of parliamentary censorship? Is it time for the UK parliament review their archaic rules?
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Yes, you should be allowed to speak truth in Parliament
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Yes, you should be allowed to speak truth in Parliament

Members of Parliament should be able to at least point out the truth in the House of Commons and not be censored into concealing facts in flowery or misleading language. It is incredibly damaging when parliament rules and the media combined allow a politicians to lie to the British population unchallenged, and this is what Dawn Butler was calling out. But Butler's words, despite being true, break the "rules of politeness in the House of Commons chamber", which dictate that accusations of deliberate deceit and dishonesty are forbidden. In an era of misinformation, fake news or post truth is it not better for MPs to free from censorship, when so many are so clearly lying and immorally misinforming the public ... during a pandemic…

A High Court judicial review brought by the Good Law Project exposed PM advisors and the Home Secretary, Priti Patel, for having illegally lobbied the government for money. Butler referred to is and to numerous statements made by Johnson on economic growth, NHS spending and nurses’ bursaries over the last year which when fact checked were found to be clearly lies. Former House of Commons speaker, John Bercow, defended Butler, saying “the glaring weakness of the system is that someone lying to tens of millions of citizens knows he or she is protected by an ancient rule... they face no sanction. By contrast, an MP with the guts to tell the truth is judged to be in disgrace. It is absurd.” [1]

lbc.co.uk/radio/presenters/james-obrien/james-obrien-significance-dawn-butler-boris-johnson joe.co.uk/news/281737-281737 theguardian.com/politics/2021/apr/22/vip-lane-for-covid-suppliers-left-uk-civil-servants-drowning-in-non-credible-bids telegraf.id/priti-patel-in-20m-ppe-lobbying-storm [1] independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/boris-johnson-lie-butler-bercow-b1890404.html uk.news.yahoo.com/boris-johnson-tories-government-conservatives-lies-new-website-peter-oborne-163933546.html

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DH edited this paragraph
Members of Parliament should be able to at least point out the truth in the House of Commons and not be censored into concealing facts in flowery or misleading language. It is incredibly damaging when parliament rules and the media combined allow a politicians to lie to the British population unchallenged, and this is what Dawn Butler was calling out. But Butler's words, despite being true, break the "rules of politeness in the House of Commons chamber", which dictate that accusations of deliberate deceit and dishonesty are forbidden. In an era of misinformation, fake news or post truth is it not better for MPs to free from censorship, when so many are so clearly lying and immorally misinforming the public ... during a pandemic…
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