D H
Apr 24 · Last update 20 days ago.

Is Biden really pulling out of Afghanistan?

On the 14th April 2021 US President Joe Biden announced that the US military would begin to withdraw from Afghanistan on May 1st and completely withdraw from the country by September 11th, to mark the 20th anniversary of the 2001 World Trade Centre and Pentagon terror attacks. However this announcement, while welcomed by many, was divisive and raised concerns for others, with some even calling the withdrawal plan itself into question for various reasons. Indeed previous president Donald Trump attempted to orchestrate a withdrawal to end the “forever wars” and was met with resistance, even Biden’s withdrawal start date of May 1st was the original withdrawal deadline negotiated by Trump with the Defence Department before leaving office. So, will Biden really follow through on pulling out of Afghanistan? What issues will stand in his way, either way?
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No – just privatising the occupation
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No – just privatising the occupation

Biden's plan is not to withdraw from Afghanistan but to full privatise the US military presence there, to keep up the illusion of withdrawing without losing influence in the region. Biden has aimed to withdraw the 2,500 official US troops and the additional 6,000 NATO troops, but as of January 2021 over 18,000 private military contractors remain in Afghanistan according to a Defense Department report, including US Special Forces, mercenaries, and intelligence operatives. One of these companies that profited from this arrangement is DynCorp International, which received 69 percent of all State Department funding between 2002 and 2013, adding up to over $7 billion in government contracts by 2019. These contracts are unlikely to change regardless of which way the political winds are blowing, especially baring in mind a leaked internal Pentagon memo referring to Afghanistan as the “Saudi Arabia of lithium” and the massive reserves of gold, iron, copper, cobalt and many other precious [1].

thegrayzone.com/2021/04/16/biden-afghanistan-war-privatizing-contractors [1] dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1286464/US-discovers-natural-desposits-gold-iron-copper-lithium-Afghanistan.html

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D H
Apr 25
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DH edited this paragraph
Biden's plan is not to withdraw from Afghanistan but to full privatise the US military presence there, to keep up the illusion of withdrawing without losing influence in the region. Biden has aimed to withdraw the 2,500 official US troops and the additional 6,000 NATO troops, but as of January 2021 over 18,000 private military contractors remain in Afghanistan according to a Defense Department report, including US Special Forces, mercenaries, and intelligence operatives. One of these companies that profited from this arrangement is DynCorp International, which received 69 percent of all State Department funding between 2002 and 2013, adding up to over $7 billion in government contracts by 2019. These contracts are unlikely to change regardless of which way the political winds are blowing, especially baring in mind a leaked internal Pentagon memo referring to Afghanistan as the “Saudi Arabia of lithium” and the massive reserves of gold, iron, copper, cobalt and many other precious [1].
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