D H
Oct 19 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

Should COVID vaccines be given to children?

Despite large proportions of the population in most developed nations being vaccinated against COVID-19, the virus is still being spread and even on the rise in many countries internationally. Scientists remain divided on the subject of spread amongst children, who have thus far remained unvaccinated with vaccine rollout targeting the most vulnerable first, i.e. immune compromised and the elderly. As some nations go ahead and vaccinate children, this topic seems to be dividing policymakers too, with nations such as the United States, Israel and Indonesia opting to vaccinate children, while the UK and many European nations seem more hesitant to do so. What are the issues surrounding vaccinating children against COVID-19? What do you think, should COVID vaccines be administered to children?
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No, vaccines are being wasted on children
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As long as its up to the individual who cares?
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No
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Yes
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No, vaccines are being wasted on children

International high-risk groups should be vaccinated first, despite most countries clearly missing the big picture here this is a global pandemic that mainly effects the elderly and frail, vaccinations are being wasted on children. Why not give all these extra doses to other countries and stop pretending countries can be permanently isolated from one another, vaccines should be given to the most vulnerable, especially those who may not have access to the best hospital care, to offer patients most isolated and most at risk from falling seriously ill with COVID-19. Indeed even the director-general of the World Health Organisation, Tedros Ghebreyesus, has said that "wealthier countries that are vaccinating children are doing so at the expense of health-care workers and high-risk groups in other countries" [1]. The dearth for vaccine donations should be treated with much greater urgency than efforts to vaccinate children, especially in light of the shocking level of vaccination in developing parts of the world, for example only 2% across Africa; our priorities are in the wrong place vaccinating children.

[1] reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-europe-children-idUSKCN2D620D news.un.org/en/story/2021/09/1099872 theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jun/08/vaccinating-britain-children-adults-overseas economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/healthcare/biotech/healthcare/more-data-needed-before-we-can-start-vaccinating-children/articleshow/87009753.cms

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D H
Oct 24
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As long as its up to the individual who cares?

As long as the vaccine is not mandated and it is not forced on to people who cares if children are vaccinated or not, it should be left up to the parents. We should be viewing the vaccination as the more the merrier to get closer to herd immunity, so if the parent of the child understands the risks and wants to go ahead to protect society at large then why not? But the parents and doctor of the child should be the ones left to weigh up the pros and cons and make the decision, otherwise it will just seem like pharmaceutical companies and their lobbied politicians trying to maximize vaccines and profit from the pandemic… The role of kids as super-spreaders seems increasingly unlikely if schools put the correct measures in place, and they are less vulnerable to the virus, so it clearly needs to be prioritised less and should therefore just be up to the individual.

nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/03/23/making-vaccination-mandatory-for-all-children/parents-deserve-to-have-a-choice-about-vaccination timesunion.com/news/article/Most-Capital-Region-15769774.php

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D H
Oct 24
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No

Children are not as vulnerable to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and studies show us that natural immunity from getting the virus and recovering is far greater than any vaccine can offer, so why vaccinate children? This would only make sense if they initial claims on the vaccine were true, that the vaccines were over 90% effective and offer lasting protection against infection, but we have found that not only were vaccines less effective than initially thought, they are less effective against the now widespread delta variant and the immunity gained from vaccines wanes in a few months. COVID vaccines are different to other vaccines, they were at the end of the day rushed through, and myocarditis and pericarditis has emerged as increasingly common side effects since Israel and the United States began vaccinating young people.

The UK and many EU countries have now decided it is safer for young people to get COVID than to risk myocarditis, following evidence of the Moderna vaccine is causing cases of myocarditis in children. Not many other countries have achieved close to 90%, only UAE, Portugal and Cuba, and now more and more countries are giving up on the pipe dream of herd immunity as vaccination and policy seem ill-equipped to deal with the pandemic. Some studies show that despite what is commonly claimed, children are not a significant source of spread of COVID-19, and if they are also not as vulnerable to the virus then why waste vaccines on them and risk the rare, but extremely dangerous, side effects?

pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/146/2/e2020004879 ourworldindata.org/covid-vaccinations stationgossip.com/2021/10/are-children-better-protected-by.html msn.com/en-us/health/medical/pfizer-vaccine-s-first-dose-less-effective-than-originally-thought-says-israel-s-virus-czar/ar-BB1cXGLz

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D H
Oct 24
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Yes

Any controversy around COVID-19 vaccines for children revolve around the issues of an increase in myocarditis and pericarditis, an inflammation of the heart, after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination in children, but these cases are extremely rare, and the majority that have experienced this side effect have quickly recovered after medication and rest. The side effects of vaccinations in general remains low, and mRNA vaccines are no exception, so many other vaccines are routinely given to children, the risk posed by the illnesses they act on massively outweighs any extremely rare side effects. Another reason to want to avoid spread of COVID-19 in children, although symptoms are rare in children, is to avoid persistent symptoms long after infect, so called "long COVID", seems to still be a significant risk for children, as is the risk of co-infection alongside other common viruses which could lead to hospitalisation, vaccination would be much safer. It is not just the US, Israel, and Indonesia, but also China, Chile, and Canada that have come to this conclusion, more countries should still be trying to achieve herd immunity and this can probably only be achieved by including children in vaccination programs.

mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/in-depth/covid-19-vaccines-for-kids/art-20513332 nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01898-9

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D H
Oct 19
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