D H
Jul 3 ยท Last update 3 mo. ago.

Why is it so common for indigenous women go missing or be murdered?

Despite making up a relatively small portion of society in the United States and Canada, indigenous women are massively overrepresented when it comes to murder and disappearances. Indigenous Americans are two and a half times more likely to be the victims of violent crime, around twice as likely to be a victim of rape or sexual assault compared to other races, and 61% of American Native women have been assaulted in their lifetimes [1]. What is behind the commonality of Native Canadians and Americans going missing or being murdered? What could be done differently to address this crisis? [1] ncai.org/attachments/PolicyPaper_tWAjznFslemhAffZgNGzHUqIWMRPkCDjpFtxeKEUVKjubxfpGYK_Policy%20Insights%20Brief_VAWA_020613.pdf
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Societal Racism
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Societal Racism

It is at the most foundational level the racist and failed law enforcement that leads to the massive failure in addressing the issue of missing and murdered Native American women, but these attitudes are pervasive and exist both culturally, politically and legally as well. White men perpetrate the majority of attacks against indigenous women, but due to loopholes in federal law Tribal police cannot arrest non-Natives, even within Reservation territory. The problem is political also as in recent years US Congress failed to pass H.R. 1585 - the Violence Against Women Reauthorisation Act of 2019, it passed the House but it was not even taken up by the Republican majority Senate.

It is structural issues caused by bureaucratic loopholes and jurisdictional gaps that perpetuate the fact that one third of indigenous women are sexually assaulted, and two thirds of these attacks are from other races outside their community, yet their is near impunity for the criminals responsible. The larger culture in America utilises native culture in demeaning ways, often with violent or sexual undertones, a dismembered Native American head as football mascot, sacred and spiritual clothing in highly sexualised areas such as music festivals and catwalk runways. All of which help build a hyper-sexualised image in the American psyche and worsen the crisis that is sexual assault against native women.

ojp.gov/pdffiles1/nij/249736.pdf whowhatwhy.org/justice/criminal-justice/the-sexual-assault-crisis-facing-native-american-women zora.medium.com/indigenous-girls-and-women-are-the-most-vulnerable-to-sex-trafficking-1f87530f5e0e gq.com/story/senate-violence-against-women-act aljazeera.com/features/2019/10/23/crow-nation-is-a-place-where-one-could-vanish-and-many-have

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D H
Jul 5
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DH edited this paragraph
It is at the most foundational level the racist and failed law enforcement that leads to the massive failure in addressing the issue of missing and murdered Native American women, but these attitudes are pervasive and exist both culturally, politically and legally as well. White men perpetrate the majority of attacks against indigenous women, but due to loopholes in federal law Tribal police cannot arrest non-Natives, even within Reservation territory. The problem is political also as in recent years US Congress failed to pass H.R. 1585 - the Violence Against Women Reauthorisation Act of 2019, it passed the House but it was not even taken up by the Republican majority Senate.
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