D H
Jan 8 · Last update 3 mo. ago.

Is mRNA vaccine technology safe?

The search for an innovative and effective treatment for the COVID-19 pandemic has led to the approval of new mRNA (or messenger RNA) vaccines for use on humans for the first time. mRNA vaccines use the body’s natural cellular protein creation process to produce foreign proteins that cause an appropriate immune response. In December 2020 a video of Tennessee Nurse Tiffany Dover fainting after receiving a SARS-CoV-2 vaccination live on television went viral, this fed online conspiracy theories that mRNA vaccinations approved to treat COVID-19 were dangerous and that the nurse had died. Government’s are now seemingly experiencing some difficulty in actually delivering vaccines at the scale needed, while vaccine skepticism poses a significant hurdle moving forward in causing herd immunity through vaccination. Are mRNA vaccines safe? Are they the best medical response to the COVID-19 pandemic? Is vaccination our only hope to end this pandemic?
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Messenger RNA vaccine scepticism is based on concerns that mRNA will cause permanent changes to a person's DNA. But coronaviruses, and the mRNA vaccine like it, uses the body's innate protein production mechanism and doesn't interfere with the cells nucleus or the body's DNA sequence. On the other hand mRNA vaccines offer advantages over traditional vaccines, for being faster and cheaper to produce, and this is why they seemed the most promising solution for public health bodies and biotechnology companies. The UK's Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) were the first to approve this technology for use in humans, and MHRA CEO June Raine said "no corners have been cut in approving it ... the benefits outweigh any risk". [1]

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5906799 usatoday.com/story/news/factcheck/2020/12/23/fact-check-nurse-who-fainted-after-being-vaccinated-alive/4024424001 nypost.com/2020/12/18/nurse-faints-while-talking-to-press-about-getting-covid-19-vaccine [1] bbc.com/news/54893437

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D H
Jan 8
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DH edited this paragraph
Messenger RNA vaccine scepticism is based on concerns that mRNA will cause permanent changes to a person's DNA. But coronaviruses, and the mRNA vaccine like it, uses the body's innate protein production mechanism and doesn't interfere with the cells nucleus or the body's DNA sequence. On the other hand mRNA vaccines offer advantages over traditional vaccines, for being faster and cheaper to produce, and this is why they seemed the most promising solution for public health bodies and biotechnology companies. The UK's Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) were the first to approve this technology for use in humans, and MHRA CEO June Raine said "no corners have been cut in approving it ... the benefits outweigh any risk". [1]
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