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Dec 2 · Last update 2 mo. ago.

Do we need to rethink the concept of genocide?

Raphael Lemkin coined the term Genocide in 1943 based upon his studies of the systematic mass murder of Armenians and Assyrians by the Ottoman Empire during World War One, and the 1933 Simele massacre of Assyrians in Iraq. Lemkin believed that the perpetrators of both of these acts needed to be prosecuted, and invented the term genocide as an amalgam of the Greek word genos, meaning race or people, and the Latin suffix ‘-caedo’, meaning the act of killing. The word genocide has since become a widely used term and is synonymous with some of the most sickening war crimes of the 20th century. However there has been a severe lack of convictions for such acts and the legal process for doing so is slow and convoluted. Likewise the term has also become highly political and is therefore not without controversy, denial runs high with acts of genocide and official recognition of an act of genocide can vary from country to country depending on diplomatic ties. Do we need to rethink the concept of genocide?
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No, we just need to recognise them
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No, we just need to recognise them

Most acts of genocide are still not widely recognised, and the fact that they are not is purely political and does not reflect badly on the concept of genocide, and the lack of convictions for acts of genocide is the more problematic matter here. Instead what may need replacing is the function of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the ICC is tasked with prosecuting genocides, war crimes, and crimes against humanity, but the failure to prosecute lies with this court rather than the conceptualisation of these crimes. The ICC lacks the support, jurisdiction and cooperation to enable the court to prosecute, making investigations slow to the point of dysfunction, addressing these political and judicial issues would be much more beneficial than rehashing the term genocide.

smleo.com/2016/04/12/the-unfortunate-failures-of-the-international-criminal-court

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Dec 4
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DH edited this paragraph
Most acts of genocide are still not widely recognised, and the fact that they are not is purely political and does not reflect badly on the concept of genocide, and the lack of convictions for acts of genocide is the more problematic matter here. Instead what may need replacing is the function of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the ICC is tasked with prosecuting genocides, war crimes, and crimes against humanity, but the failure to prosecute lies with this court rather than the conceptualisation of these crimes. The ICC lacks the support, jurisdiction and cooperation to enable the court to prosecute, making investigations slow to the point of dysfunction, addressing these political and judicial issues would be much more beneficial than rehashing the term genocide.
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